keel

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keel

1
1. one of the main longitudinal structural members of a vessel to which the frames are fastened and that may extend into the water to provide lateral stability
2. any structure corresponding to or resembling the keel of a ship, such as the central member along the bottom of an aircraft fuselage
3. Biology a ridgelike part; carina

keel

2 Eastern English dialect
1. a flat-bottomed vessel, esp one used for carrying coal
2. a measure of coal equal to about 21 tons

keel

a fatal disease of young ducks, characterized by intestinal bleeding caused by Salmonella bacteria

Keel

 

(1) Keel of a vessel—a longitudinal, usually composite, beam running in the middle of the vessel bottom from the bow to the stern. The keel serves as a basic longitudinal link providing strength and rigidity to the bottom and overall stability to the vessel’s hull.

Wooden vessels have a keel in the form of a bar; this form was also retained on old metal-hull vessels (bar keel). On modern double-bottomed steel vessels the keel consists of a thick reinforced plate on the bottom and one or two (duct keel) vertical plates located between the double bottom. Bilge keels (side keels) in the form of long rigid plates are installed along what is called the turn of the bilge on the outside of the hull in order to lessen the rolling of the vessel.

(2) Keel of an airship—fin or vertical stabilizer—part of the tail unit of an aircraft located in a vertical (or inclined) plane and designed to provide directional stability. A flight rudder is attached by hinges to the trailing edge of the fin.

keel

[kēl]
(naval architecture)
A steel beam or timber, or a series of steel beams and plates or timbers joined together, extending along the center of the bottom of a ship from stem to stern and often projecting below the bottom, to which the frames and hull plating are attached.
(vertebrate zoology)
The median ridge on the breastbone in certain birds. Also known as carina.

Keel

[kēl]
(astronomy)

keel

An appendage of a molding, usually a fillet, on the furthest projection of a molding.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The painting is thought to be the only detailed work showing a keel boat and as such it is historically interesting and important."
It is thought that the keel is portrayed in the area around the mouth of the Ouseburn.
The material that comprises them must thicken, stabilise, and cool under the continent to form a strong, buoyant, keel that is fundamental for preserving the surface landmass against the relentless destructive forces of earth's tectonic activity.
Keels is one in a group of authors, with 20 books published between them, at Kingdom Family Worship Center International in Kent, Washington, home to a number of writers, actors, dancers, songwriters, and recording artists.
The interaction between the keel and the Antilles subduction zone - a place where the South American Plate is nudging under the Caribbean Plate - causes material to slide along, instead of destroying or generating new formations, Becker explained in a phone interview.
Sailing boat components such as the keel and rudder are typically relatively simple to produce for leisure ships.
For a smoother ride and stability--the ability to counterbalance the force of the wind on the sails--the Procyon uses a combination of two forms of movable ballast: first, a novel arrangement in which large winglets are attached to a canting keel, and a more conventional water-ballast system in which water is shifted to pairs of tanks placed on either side of the hull.
Neville Crichton, the owner of super maxi Alfa Romeo, has defended canting keel boats against claims that they are unsafe in a letter to the sailing website scuttlebutteurope.com.
The hum of the engine, the small rise in revs as the keel moved from the vertical out 10 degrees, and a bit of chat calling the breeze as it curled over Bradleys Head.
The system operates in the limited one-and-a-half-foot work area immediately above the keel. The Navy provided a special hydraulic unit that extends the reach of the drill system 14 inches as it bores deeper into the keel.
In the bottom of the drydock, Don Turner, the Center's production manager, taps the ship's keel with the metal tip of his measuring tape.
* Maximum weight for keel, fin and bulb of 7.4 tonnes (To ensure weight saved in the structure could not be added to the keel to improve performance)