keeper


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keeper

Physics a soft iron or steel bar placed across the poles of a permanent magnet to close the magnetic circuit when it is not in use
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

keeper

[′kēp·ər]
(electromagnetism)
A bar of iron or steel placed across the poles of a permanent magnet to complete the magnetic circuit when the magnet is not in use, to avoid the self-demagnetizing effect of leakage lines. Also known as magnet keeper.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

strike plate, strike, striking plate

A metal plate or box which is set in a doorjamb and is either pierced or recessed to receive the bolt or latch of a lock, fixed on a door. Also see box strike plate.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
"I say, keeper," said he meekly, "let me go for two bob?"
"I'm coming down, keeper," said Tom at last, with a sigh, fairly tired out.
How changed and stern the Doctor seemed from the last time that Tom was up there, as the keeper told the story, not omitting to state how Tom had called him blackguard names.
Seeing this, Don Quixote ordered the keeper to take a stick to him and provoke him to make him come out.
"That I won't," said the keeper; "for if I anger him, the first he'll tear in pieces will be myself.
The keeper obeyed, and Don Quixote, fixing on the point of his lance the cloth he had wiped his face with after the deluge of curds, proceeded to recall the others, who still continued to fly, looking back at every step, all in a body, the gentleman bringing up the rear.
The prisoners, in their expressive language, have named it the "Lions' Den," probably because the captives possess teeth which frequently gnaw the bars, and sometimes the keepers also.
Oh, what larks!" Meanwhile the object of this hideous admiration approached the wicket, against which one of the keepers was leaning.
"And you will chance incurring the wrath of O-Tar, who has no love for this savage barbarian," explained the keeper.
"It is a strange request," said the keeper, "but for my friend O-Zar I would do even more, though of course--" he hesitated--"it is customary for one who would be chief to make some slight payment."
``How long is it since the good keeper has been here?'' said the knight to his host, after having swallowed several hasty morsels of this reinforcement to the hermit's good cheer.
``Holy Clerk,'' said the knight, when his hunger was appeased, ``I would gage my good horse yonder against a zecchin, that that same honest keeper to whom we are obliged for the venison has left thee a stoup of wine, or a reinlet of canary, or some such trifle, by way of ally to this noble pasty.