keratin


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keratin

keratin (kĕrˈətĭn), any one of a class of fibrous protein molecules that serve as structural units for various living tissues. The keratins are the major protein components of hair, wool, nails, horn, hoofs, and the quills of feathers. These proteins generally contain large quantities of the sulfur-containing amino acids, particulary cysteine. The helical keratin molecules twist around each other to form elongated strands called intermediate filaments. The formation of a covalent chemical bond called a disulfide bridge between the sulfer atoms on two cysteins on separate polypeptide chains of keratin allows for the cross-linkage of these chains and results in a fairly rigid aggregate. This phenomenon is seen to be consistent with the physiological role of the keratins, which provide a tough, fibrous matrix for the tissues in which they are found. Human hair is approximately 14% cystine (cysteins cross-linked by disulfide bridges).
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keratin

[′ker·əd·ən]
(biochemistry)
Any of various albuminoids characteristic of epidermal derivatives, such as nails and feathers, which are insoluble in protein solvents, have a high sulfur content, and generally contain cystine and arginine as the predominating amino acids.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

keratin

A proteinaceous material used as a retarder for plaster.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

keratin

, ceratin
a fibrous protein that occurs in the outer layer of the skin and in hair, nails, feathers, hooves, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The global Keratin market is on the verge of accumulating steady revenue over the forecast period, according to the latest report on Wise Guy Research (WGR).
The keratin solution was electrospun using an electrospinning instrument with a single needle consisting of a syringe with 5 mL of solution and a KDS 200 high-precision syringe pump (KD Scientific Inc.).
The keratinolytic potential of the isolates was evaluated on both the soluble keratin and the native feathers (0.5%w/v).
megaterium have been reported for keratin degradation (Kim et al., 2004; Riffel and Brandelli, 2006).
We visualized the [Ca.sup.2+] flux in neonatal cardiomyocytes plated on keratin using the fluorescent calcium binding dye, Fluo4.
The surfactant generally helped to decrease the diffusion rate of water from keratin solution and resulted in slow rate of particle formation.
Total SDS-Soluble Keratin. Total SDS-soluble keratin was prepared by extracting mouse hair (2 mg) twice with 50 mM [Na.sub.2]HP[O.sub.4],20 mM NaOH, 25 mM DTT, and 1% SDS (200 [micro]l, 65[degrees]C, 1 h each).
The immunogen (keratin) was first mixed with an equal volume of complete Freund's adjuvant to form an emulsion.
Their work has resulted in targeted nutritional interventions--highly bioavailable forms of collagen peptides and solubilized keratin, combined with biotin and silicon.
We have incorporated keratin, fish oil omega 3, and snake oil into our new range of shampoos to offer solutions for hair fall problems, split ends, dullness and bring new life and confidence to our consumers."
The exact pathogenesis of EVHC has not been fully elucidated, although an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance has been reported in some cases, and an association with mutations in genes encoding keratin 17 and keratin 6b has been noted.
Meanwhile, European researchers identified KLHL24 mutations in families from Finland, Germany, Israel, Italy, Switzerland, and Qatar and confirmed that these mutations affect the equilibrium between intermediate keratin filaments and keratin breakdown that is necessary for skin integrity (Am J Hum Genet.