callus

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Related to keratoma: keratosis

callus:

see corns and callusescorns and calluses,
thickenings of the outer layer of skin where there is irritation or constant pressure. Corns are cone-shaped with their points protruding into the dermis, or inner layer of skin. They usually have hard, shiny surfaces surrounded by red, painful areas.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Callus

 

(1) Tissue formed in plants on the surface of a wound (cracks, taps, the bases of cuttings, and areas of concrescence of stock and scion). A callus promotes the healing of wounds. Consisting of thin-walled parenchymal cells, a callus develops when there is cell division of any living tissue of the plant (cambium or phloem) in the peripheral zone of the pith, lying next to the protoxylem. Adventitious roots and buds, particularly with grafting, often develop in the callus. (2) Corpus callosum, an accumulation of callóse that obstructs the sieve plate when the sieve tubes of the phloem age. Use of the term in this sense is obsolete.


Callus

 

a thickening of the horny layer of skin as a result of constant pressure or friction. Calluses usually appear on the palms, soles, and other parts of the body that are in constant contact with tough surfaces. The cracks formed on the surface of a callus may hinder one’s ability to work, and they can also be portals of entry for pyogenic microbes, resulting in such conditions as erysipelatous inflammations and phlegmons.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

callus

[′kal·əs]
(botany)
A thickened callose deposit on sieve plates.
A hard tissue that forms over a damaged plant surface.
(medicine)
Hard, thick area on the surface of the skin.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

callus

1. an area of skin that is hard or thick, esp on the palm of the hand or sole of the foot, as from continual friction or pressure
2. an area of bony tissue formed during the healing of a fractured bone
3. Botany
a. a mass of hard protective tissue produced in woody plants at the site of an injury
b. an accumulation of callose in the sieve tubes
4. Biotechnology a mass of undifferentiated cells produced as the first stage in tissue culture
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Aiello (1998) opined that there are four common stages in the development ocular tumors which include plaques, keratomas, papillomas and eventually carcinoma, however in present case it was restricted to papillomatous stage or benign stage.
Spilsbury, Miller, Semmens, and Lannigan (2010) explained that small inner ear tumors called cholesteatomas or keratomas can develop over time due to accumulation of cerumen and chronic ear infections.
Various developmental malformations have been reported to be associated with osteopoikilosis, including: coarctation of the aorta, double ureter, pubertas praecox, urogenital defects, growth abnormalities, peptic ulcer, diabetes mellitus at the endodermal strata level; arthritis, exostoses, osteitis condensans ilii, Klippel-Feil Syndrome, melorheostosis, spinal stenosis, cervical myelopathy, dacryocystitis, giant cell tumor, fibrous dysplasia, chondrosarcoma, osteosarcoma, synovial chondromatosis at the mesodermal level; facial abnormalities, hare lip, dental abnormalities, dermatofibrosis lenticularis disseminata, keloid formation, plantar and palmar keratomas at the ectodermal level (14-16).