kerogen


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Related to kerogen: kerogen shale

kerogen

[′ker·ə·jən]
(geology)
The complex, fossilized organic material present in sedimentary rocks, especially in shales; converted to petroleum products by distillation. Also known as kerabitumen; petrologen.
References in periodicals archive ?
2]O, was highly dependent upon the interaction between the mineral matrix and kerogen of the shale.
Modern distinctions are similar in that oil shale technically refers to rocks that need to be retorted to convert kerogen to crude oil, while shale oil is associated with crude oil trapped in shale, and tight oil is any crude oil trapped in a rock of low permeability such that the crude oil cannot flow.
The country's mineable deposits contain large quantities of clay and kerogen (fossilized material), which makes them more difficult to fracture and therefore less productive.
Shale oil, however, is an excellent option for climate change as its kerogen can be used on a large scale to produce ultra-clean fuels.
They are rich in kerogen (a less developed form of crude oil).
Kerogen (organic chemical compounds) in the limestone calcined to make cement are vaporized and form toxic organic air pollutants.
Oil shale, an organic-rich fine-grained sedimentary rock, contains significant amounts of kerogen (a solid mixture of organic chemical compounds) from which liquid hydrocarbons can be extracted.
Bitumen (the organic material in "oil sands") and kerogen (the material in "oil shale") can also be turned into liquid fuels.
Oil shale is a fine-grained sedimentary rock that contains significant amounts of kerogen, a solid mixture of organic chemical compounds that can be converted into synthetic liquid fuel or into shale gas.
She chose amino acids as a proxy for organic material because the anomalous sulfur isotopes often come from sedimentary rock, black shale, which also contains abundant mature kerogen - a mixture of organic compounds.
The remains of any of these organisms can be destroyed when intense heat and pressure deep within Earth convert the molecules into petroleum and kerogen, a mixture of longchain, carbon-rich compounds.