kerogen


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Related to kerogen: kerogen shale

kerogen

[′ker·ə·jən]
(geology)
The complex, fossilized organic material present in sedimentary rocks, especially in shales; converted to petroleum products by distillation. Also known as kerabitumen; petrologen.
References in periodicals archive ?
London-listed Hurricane said Kerogen was still a major shareholder, with a 16% stake and a nominated representative on its board.
The Kerogen type II in the lower most part while Kerogen type III in the middle and upper part with indigenous hydrocarbon potential was observed.
Organic matter including mineral nutrients and aquatic organisms can increase bioproductivity, while terrigenous and aquatic organic matters determine kerogen types [17].
In this work, a triple-porosity model comprising kerogen system, matrix system, and natural fracture system was established.
Modern distinctions are similar in that oil shale technically refers to rocks that need to be retorted to convert kerogen to crude oil, while shale oil is associated with crude oil trapped in shale, and tight oil is any crude oil trapped in a rock of low permeability such that the crude oil cannot flow.
Liquids other than crude and lease condensate --including natural gas plant liquids (NGPL), biofuels, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), kerogen (oil shale), and refinery gain--supply a relatively small portion of total world petroleum and other liquid fuels, accounting for about 14% of the total in 2010.
where [[PHI]'.sub.organic] is the organoporosity of shale under ideal conditions (%), w(TO[C.sub.0]) is the weight percent of the original total organic carbon (%), [I.sub.H0] is the original cracking hydrocarbon of unit quality organic carbon (mg/g), F([R.sub.0]) is the transformation ratio of oil and gas generated from organic matter (%), which is correlated with maturity, [[rho].sub.rock] is the density of shale (g/[cm.sup.3]), and [[rho].sub.kerogen] is the density of kerogen, which is approximately 1.2 g/[cm.sup.3] [16, 31].
While the environmental impact of the process of converting Kerogen contained in the rock to oil, via a complex heat and
The country's mineable deposits contain large quantities of clay and kerogen (fossilized material), which makes them more difficult to fracture and therefore less productive.
Shale oil, however, is an excellent option for climate change as its kerogen can be used on a large scale to produce ultra-clean fuels.
They are rich in kerogen (a less developed form of crude oil).