keyboard entry

keyboard entry

[′kē‚bȯrd ′en·trē]
(computer science)
A piece of information fed manually into a computing system by means of a set of keys, such as a typewriter.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of these apps use embedded analytics which allows developers to even record the screen and screenshot every tap, button push, and keyboard entry to see how a user interacted with the app and if something did not work properly or had an error.
The brokerage had planned to pay 1,000 won dividend per share to its employees in the employee stock ownership program last Friday, but paid 1,000 shares instead due to a keyboard entry mistake.
To the degree that AI reliably frees designers from mundane tasks for instance, by allowing them to dictate specs instead of relying on keyboard entry greater time will be provided to think, create and connect for projects.
For example, flights can be arranged by arrival/departure time, current status or by flight number and the search tab allows quick keyboard entry of flight number or destination airport.
KeyWorx is designed for data entry professionals, programmers, video editors, or anyone suffering from repetitive stress syndrome or other disabilities that limit keyboard entry. The solution might sound a little unusual until you think about other foot controls that are as natural as hand strokes.
Users can now combine dictation and voice commands with mouse and keyboard entry within Microsoft Word 2011, making it easier to create and edit documents.
And the shift from keyboard entry on clunky thermal paper dumb terminals to netbooks took 40 years.
It uses multiple modalities, including natural speech, barcode scanning and keyboard entry, to exchange information between an enterprise system and mobile workers who are equipped with speech-ready mobile computers.
Most drawing or modifying functions within the application allow users to switch on dynamic dimensions displaying either x, y, or polar coordinates, thus allowing users to identify the next position without keyboard entry. The increment of the dynamic dimensions can be set to suit requirements.
As a result of AIDC's advice TES are in the process of introducing meaningful shop floor data collection, they will shortly be installing touch screen computers, and will make extensive use of bar codes on documents, parts, and employees to eliminate the need for keyboard entry.