kibbutz

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kibbutz:

see collective farmcollective farm,
an agricultural production unit including a number of farm households or villages working together under state control. The description of the collective farm has varied with time and place.
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kibbutz

(pl. kibbutzim) small socialistic agricultural communities (of between 50 and 1000 or more members) established in modern Israel, with the aim, among other things, of producing an alternative to the conventional FAMILY. The objective has been to achieve social equality between men and women by making both child-rearing and work a collective responsibility (although links between children and their biological parents remain strong). Assessments of kibbutzim (see Bettleheim, 1969) suggest that they have been more successful in child-rearing than in achieving an overall equalization in the DIVISION OF LABOUR and relations between the sexes.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the kibbutzniks at that meeting asked Simone de Beauvoir unabashedly: "Madame de Beauvoir, could it be possible that you write books because you do not have children?" Unruffled, she replied: "Sir, could it be possible that you have children because you do not write books?"
The true dreamers were another group from the 55th, the more religious soldiers who are initially condescended to by the secular kibbutzniks: Hanan Porat, Yoel BinNun, and Yisrael Harel.
Like many classic comedies, A Weave of Women ends with healing language and even a marriage, between Simha and her kibbutznik. And yet the benediction spoken by one character warns of , even welcomes, the challenge of future obstacles: "May the house not be a cage.
Jackie Levi, Jerusalem journalist, noted that when he first visited Katmandu in the mid-80s, the Israelis he met there were "the types who used to go hiking in the Judean desert." Many of these new "India hands" were kibbutzniks. They were used to physical hardships and spartan living.
With a strong sense of the present and future implications of the analyses, histories and evaluations, the various kibbutz movements themselves and numerous kibbutznik social scientists participate actively in research projects and discussions of the state of their community.
He is a veteran of the Israel Defense Forces and a former kibbutznik.
In his In the Land of Israel, Amos Oz, anAshkenazi and a kibbutznik, recorded the words of a second-generation Morroccan Jew:
"Obviously you had religious Jews growing beards, as they have for centuries, but you also had a sort of kibbutznik aesthetic, a very free-growing and free-flowing facial hair that didn't get too much attention." Other groups traditionally affiliated with facial hair included Israeli Arabs and the Druze, who make up about 2 percent of the Israeli population.
She started by treating severely wounded kibbutznik soldiers, and in 1999 opened her Tel Aviv clinic to the general public.
The well-being of the individual was respected and promoted, as long as this well-being resonated with the well-being of the group." (101) An awareness of such expectations led many Yekkes, like Agnes Weiler Wolf's father, a fifty-two-year-old (102) lawyer, to choose moshavim or agricultural villages like Nahariya over kibbutzim: "my father is totally unfit to live in a collective community" writes Agnes, and she laughs at "the absurdity of turning [her] self-centered, individualistic father into a Kibbutznik." (103)
On the contrary, after deciding that he was not comfortable handling live chickens and switching to another job, one of the kibbutznik calls him "gveret" (lady), impugning his masculinity because he "doesn't like the chickens." Rakoff describes this, somewhat improbably, as the impetus for a significant personal epiphany:
And then there are the Israeli shoes that Lady Gaga loves-no, not the kibbutznik's two-strap sandal, but Kobi Levi's wild creations (6), dubbed "shoe creatures" and "wearable sculptures." These include a stiletto in the shape of a flamingo and a cat whose legs form the heel as it stretches.