kick

(redirected from kicked around)
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Related to kicked around: kicked back, kicking off

kick

[kik]
(petroleum engineering)
Entry of fluid into the wellbore when the pressure of the column of drilling fluid is insufficient to withstand the pressure of the fluids in the formation being drilled.
(ordnance)
Violent backward movement of a gun after being fired, caused by the rearward force of the propellant gases acting on the gun.

What does it mean when you dream about kicking?

Kicking is a rather obvious symbol for aggression and self-assertiveness. Being kicked in a dream can mean feeling abused, getting “kicked in the teeth.” The meanings of certain idioms can also find expression in dreams, idioms like “getting your kicks,” “kick the bucket,” and “kick yourself.”

kick

In a brick, a shallow indent or frog.

kick

[IRC] To cause somebody to be removed from a IRC channel, an option only available to CHOPs. This is an extreme measure, often used to combat extreme flamage or flooding, but sometimes used at the chop's whim. Compare gun.
References in periodicals archive ?
If good buildings are more than icons and architects' indulgences, they must be seen to be inhabited and used and kicked around. Glamorous pictures which conceal this serve no useful purpose.
I'm kicked around but that's my job - I've got a thick skin but I'm only a servant who is trying to get the money for the Welsh people.'
Some of the notions being kicked around research labs include tiny surface-mount disk-arrays on a card; nano-electrical mechanical systems (NEMS), which are like micro-machines in silicon; and newer types of flash memory.
We kicked around the idea of creating a proper magazine out of the existing Caucus newsletter, and I came up with Point of View, which Fusca shortened to POV.
The idea of generic wine advertising has been kicked around for a long time in the wine industry, but broad-based support faltered over disagreements about who would pay for the ads--and whether a generic approach that treats wine as a commodity was appropriate for a product whose very diversity is one of its strongest selling points.