kill

(redirected from killed with kindness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms.

kill

US a channel, stream, or river (chiefly as part of place names)

What does it mean when you dream about killing?

The act of killing in a dream need not be negative. As we grow and change, it often feels like we are “killing off’ old parts of our life. Alternatively, killing in a dream may mean that one has murdered the incentive or enthusiasm for life. (See also Murder).

kill

[kil]
(materials)
To treat in such a way as to destroy undesirable properties; for example, neutralization of an acid by the addition of an alkali.
(metallurgy)
To add a strong deoxidizer, such as silicon or aluminum, to molten steel in order to stop the reaction between carbon and oxygen forming gaseous carbon monoxide and dioxide during solidification.
(petroleum engineering)
In drilling, to prevent well blowout by appropriate measures.
In oil production, to halt well production so that reconditioning of the well may proceed.

seal

seal, 4
1. A device usually consisting of an impression upon wax or paper, or a wafer, or the inscription of the letters L.S. (locus sigilli), sometimes used in the execution of a formal legal document such as a deed or contract. In some states, the statute of limitations applicable to a contract under seal is longer than that for a contract not under seal; in most states, the seal has been deprived by statute of some or all of its legal effect.
2. An embossing device or stamp used by a design professional on his drawings and specifications as evidence of his registration in the state where the work, 1 is to be performed.

kill

To cancel. Kill, as well as "abort," and "cancel" all mean to end or exit the current process.
References in periodicals archive ?
An Approach to the Main Plot of Thomas Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness.
Money, murder, women, and tragedy seem to figure in different ways in A Yorkshire Tragedy) The Miseries of Enforced Marriage, and A Woman Killed with Kindness.
Beyond the gender-specific studies of The Fair Maid of the West and A Woman Killed with Kindness, scholarly publications from 1907 to 2013 show studies of a range of Heywood's plays and occasional or one-off study of his pageants, masques, prose works, poems, and translations.
That's the last from a playwright all but killed with kindness and performance.
This paper draws attention to the parallels between the two dramatists and emphasizes the recognition Heywood received in his own time; it then takes up A Woman Killed with Kindness, Measure for Measure, and the circumstances of their composition to argue that Shakespeare appears to have been both aware of and influenced by his contemporary's work.
dating, and impact of Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness.
For Michael McClintock, Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness employs the affective impact of tragedy to enable its central women, Anne Frankford and Susan Mountford, to morally transform Sir Francis Acton and Master Frankford.
Between accounts of the lives of medieval women saints and clinical descriptions of what came to be known in the nineteenth century as fasting girls falls A Woman Killed with Kindness.
Kinney, "Arden and the Archives"; Jan Stirm, "'This Strumpet Serves Her Own Ends': Teaching Class and Service in Early Modern Drama"; Rebecca Ann Bach, "Teaching the Details of Race and Religious Difference in Renaissance Drama"; Christina Luckyj, "Historicizing Gender: Mapping Cultural Space in Webster's The Duchess of Malfi and Cary's The Tragedy of Mariam"; Lori Schroeder Haslem, "Tragedy and the Female Body A Materialist Approach to Heywod's A Woman Killed With Kindness and Webster's
Chapter 3 on "Domestic Tragedy and Private Life" analyzes Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness, the anonymous sensational plays Arden of Faversham, A Yorkshire Tragedy, and A Warning for Fair Women, and Yarrington's Two Lamentable Tragedies, and Ch.
Heywood is known primarily for his 1603 tragedy, A Woman Killed with Kindness, but Paul Merchant has done students of early modern English theater a valuable service in providing superbly edited texts of three other of Heywood's best plays: the 1604 comedy, The Wise-Woman of Hogsdon, the 1624 tragicomedy, The English Traveller, and the 1624 manuscript romance, The Captives.