kilobit


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kilobit

[′kil·ə‚bit]
(computer science)
A unit of information content equal to 1024 bits. Abbreviated kbit; Kbit. Symbolized k.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

kilobit

(unit)
2^10 = 1024 bits of storage (1 Kb).

Compare kilobits per second.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

kilobit

(thousand bits). For technical specifications, it refers to 1,024 bits. In general usage, it typically refers to an even one thousand bits (see kilo). Also Kb, Kbit and K-bit. See space/time.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Megabits per second (Mbps): 1,000 kilobits per second.
Kbps (kilobits per second) A measure of the speed at which data travels - 1000 bits per second.
Broadband provides a high-speed link to the internet at speeds of up to 2048 kilobits per second, presenting significant benefits to businesses and residents alike.
With this third-generation (3G) network, CODETEL can offer subscribers new data services such as high-speed instant messaging, e-mail and Internet access at speeds of up to 144 kilobits per second (kbps).
In computer lingo, our ideal data rate needs to be 221,184 kilobits per second (or 221,184 kbps).
Coming in at 128 kilobits per second, Midband is going head-to-head with NTL's 128k "broadband" service.
Alltel's "Lite" version features download speeds of up to 256 kilobits per second, allowing customers to access graphics-intensive Web sites or download files much faster than they could with a typical 56k dial-up connection.
The Telecom/BCL project, utilizing Airspan wireless DSL technology, will deliver download controlled speeds of 128 kilobits per second, burstable to between 512 kilobits and 2 megabits per second depending on individual customer Service Level Agreements.
With maximum speeds of up to 171.2 kilobits per second, GPRS is about three times as fast as the data transmission speeds possible over today's dial-up fixed telecommunications networks.
The service is offered internationally at speeds of 64 kilobits per second (Kbps), T1/E1, 3-16 megabits per second (Mbps) and within the United States at speeds of 64 Kbps, T1 and 3-22 Mbps.
By linking channels, GPRS will increase theoretical transmission speeds from 9.6 kilobits per second to almost 100.
ADSL allows downloads from the Internet at speeds of up to 1,544 Kbps (kilobits per second) and uploads at speeds roughly half of the download speed.