kilohertz


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kilohertz

one thousand hertz; one thousand cycles per second.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

kilohertz

[′kil·ə‚hərts]
(physics)
A unit of frequency equal to 1000 hertz. Abbreviated kHz. Also known as kilocycle (kc).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

kilohertz (kHz)

The frequency of a radio carrier wave measured in thousands of cycles per second. 1 kHz = 1000 hertz.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

kilohertz

One thousand cycles per second. See Hertz.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Malaysia's civil aviation chief, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, con-firmed the frequency emitted by Flight MH370's black boxes were 37.5 kilohertz and said authorities were verifying the report.
Malaysia's civil aviation chief, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, confirmed that the frequency emitted by Flight 370's black boxes were 37.5 kilohertz and said authorities were verifying the report.
Its powerful microprocessor processes commands in 40 microseconds (10 times faster than Galil's prior generation), accepts 22 megahertz encoder inputs, and updates servos at 32 kilohertz. The controller incorporates two Galil D3040 four-axis, 500-watt drives with outputs of 20-80 volts and up to 10 amps per axis.
The electromagnetic spectrum we are most familiar with is a finite collection of frequencies between about 3,000 cycles per second (kilohertz), or 3 kHz, and 300 billion cycles per second (gigahertz), or 300 GHz.
Both devices support Standard 100 kilohertz (kHz), Fast 400 kHz, and Fast-Plus 1 megahertz (MHz) serial I2C protocols.
Wireless systems perform over a wide range of frequencies, from a few kilohertz to high frequency gigahertz systems.
The ability to perceive a sound depends on both the frequency (kilohertz) and strength (decibels) of the sound.
Most Class D amplifiers employ pulse width modulation (PWM), typically operating at a switching rate of hundreds of kilohertz to achieve the required system performance.
The recording format we use is wave 48 kilohertz (kHz) 24 bits, which is a grade higher than audio compact disc (CD) quality.
In addition to implementation challenges, almost all SFT measurements of circuits operating at more than a few kilohertz cannot be made while the board under test is physically connected to the ICT bed-of-nails fixture, resulting in the requirement for dual-level test fixturing (see dual-leveling fixturing sidebar).