kilonewton


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kilonewton

An International Standard unit of force equal to 1000 newtons, 0.2248 kips, or 224.8 pounds.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said initial conclusions were that the device had been hit with an estimated load of 56 kilonewtons, roughly equal to half of that thrown at it in testing with the impact in exactly the same place.
This engine clevis bracket is the first composite mount designed for a six-cylinder engine, and passing peak loads of 25 Kilonewtons (kN) of force.
A scalable buildingblock approach allows Tinius Olsen to offer systems from very low-force applications, just a few newtons, to very high-force applications of a thousand kilonewtons or more.
In total, the rocket can generate 22,819 Kilonewtons of thrust, which is approximately equal to eighteen Boeing 747 aircraft ay full power.
In (12)-(19), V is the vessel resulting speed in the coordinate system associated with the vessel; [R.sub.x], [R.sub.y] are the vessel resistance forces in the longitudinal and transverse directions considering the two catamaran hulls and conversion of the force dimension from kilonewtons to newtons; [R.sub.K] is approximated by the polynomial vessel resistance in kilonewtons dependent on the speed V (in m * [s.sup.-1]), obtained by simulating vessel in the OpenFOAM software; L is the vessel length in meters; [m.sub.x], [m.sub.y] are the vessel weights, taking into account water added masses in longitudinal and transverse movements; [rho] = 1025 kg x [m.sup.-3] is the sea water density.
Relative leg stiffness (kiloNewtons per meter x kg) was calculated from the average contact time and flight time across the 10 hops, together with body mass (Dalleau et al., 2004).