Kimono

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Kimono

 

the traditional Japanese costume, worn by men and women. It is a straight cut robe, which closes on the right and is secured by a sash (obi). Broad sleeves (sode) hang loosely. Kimonos worn by women are distinguished by a very wide sash and long sleeves, which are cut in one piece with the rest of the gown. There are evening, home, everyday, street, and ceremonial types of kimonos. Each type is made from a different material and has a distinctive cut.

References in periodicals archive ?
Kimonos usually have additional length to allow for a tuck under a belt used to adjust the kimono to the wearer's convenience.
Due to the floaty (and forgiving) nature of a kimono, a lot of people avoid them because they feel like they'll get lost in all the fabric.
PS PSBut when it comes to the high street interpretation, simply throwing on a kimono won't cut it this season - this trend is about taking traditional attire and bringing it bang up to date.
The entire programme was likened to a fashion show of the most colourful and sophistically designed kimonos including traditional costumes for festivals and Samurai style.
The final act was simply but effectively staged with a single kimono hanging on a stand.
Work it like a fashion warrior and check out Asos and Zara for some gorgeous affordable kimonos.
Sitting sedately in chairs, the elderly couple accompanied their grandchildren to a cultural Kimono fashion show on Thursday night, organised by their daughter Naoko Kishida.
With their elaborate kimono, white painted faces, red lips and exquisite manners, geisha are traditionally trained from a young age in a range of Japanese arts like classical dance and music, in order to entertain upmarket guests at exclusive teahouses.
Events taking place outside in the courtyard at the Mount Pleasant based venue will be a demonstration of the traditional stringed instrument the Koto by musician Sumie Kent, a haiku workshop, kimono dressing by Jill Clay and a sushi food demo from Takayasu Takemoto.
The motifs on the exhibitionCOs kimonos range from almost-abstract rivers capes to relatively realistic close-ups on blooming cherry trees.