kinesiology

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kinesiology

[kə‚nēz·ē′äl·ə·jē]
(physiology)
The study of human motion through anatomical and mechanical principles.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The KINAP was designed in 2004 to be administered during the rehabilitation process by a kinesiologist, who could use it to target physical and sports activities likely to trigger fears in individuals suffering from musculoskeletal pain.
"If we can get more children out and active, we can improve their bone health," says kinesiologist Adam Baxter-Jones of the University of Saskatchewan in Canada.
Powers, a kinesiologist and movement coach for a suggested donation of $25.
When I was training I worked with a kinesiologist and took potassium supplements and all kinds of things to stay in peak form."
Natasha Old, BN(Hons), Dip Homeopathy, AdvDip Mind/Body Medicine, is a senior mental health nurse and coaching kinesiologist, practising on the Gold Coast, Australia.
Corcos, a kinesiologist and professor of neurologic sciences at the University of Illinois, Chicago.
This is why kinesiologist and therapist Jeanette Wakeman recommends a 'colonic' to keep in tiptop mental and physical condition.
Kinesiologist Torbert (Leonard Gordon Institute for Human Development Through Play, Temple U., Philadelphia) presents a revised discussion of movement mechanics and their purposeful application for improving skills, agility, power, and accuracy to achieve success in sport and play.
"Kilo-Actif's success is largely based on the adoption of an interval training program," added Valerie Guilbault, an EPIC Centre kinesiologist who oversaw the training of the participants.
Patients are able to benefit from a variety of services, including: education sessions, nutritional assessment with a dietician, risk factor treatment (hypertension, cholesterol and smoking cessation) by physicians and nurse practitioners, medication review with a pharmacist, targeted exercise prescription by an exercise physiologist, nurse or kinesiologist and supervised exercise.
This approach to endurance measurement, as Henry argued, was the primary domain of the physical educator (or exercise scientist or kinesiologist), and not the primary interest domain of a biochemist or physiologist.