kinetic momentum


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kinetic momentum

[kə′ned·ik mə′men·təm]
(mechanics)
The momentum which a particle possesses because of its motion; in classical mechanics, equal to the particle's mass times its velocity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the energy of a photon is expressed as momentum times its velocity, we define kinetic momentum of a photon as [p.sub.k] = [E.sub.kin]/v, where the velocity v = nc and n is a unit vector along the direction of propagation.
In the above expression, h is Planck's constant while [p.sub.kin], m, v and E denote respectively the kinetic momentum, mass, velocity, and kinetic energy of the electron.
The mentioned variation is similar to that induced [12] by changing (through accelerating the voltage U) the values of kinetic momentum [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] for electrons.
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