king stud

king stud

A stud that is centrally located in a gable, usually supporting the collar purlin.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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At the rough opening height specified, fasten the header by driving two pan-head screws through each web flap (drawing the header tight to the king stud) and then driving a screw through each flange of the track.
Connect the wood buck to the metal framing by turning the solid webs of the king studs toward the rough opening and fastening the wood to the metal with 1-1/4 in.
You'll need to install the new king stud, which runs from the floor plate to the existing ceiling plate, and the new jack stud, which determines the width and height of the new rough opening and supports one end of the new header (Photo 4).
The other end of the new header is nailed to the king stud that supported the old door header.
beyond the opening marks on each side to locate the inside edge of the king studs. Cut king studs and nail them to the top and bottom plates.
Mark an "X" outside these marks for the full-height king studs.
Cut and nail (use 16d sinker nails) these pieces together, then drop them between the king studs. Nail them to the king studs and the top plate.
Use a sledgehammer to knock the king studs and trimmers away from the ends of the existing header (Photo 3).
The vertical pillars supporting each end (normally composed of 2x4s or 2x6s) are called king studs and trimmers (or jack studs).
TRIMMERS are the shorter studs nailed to "king studs" on both sides of a door or window opening.
Carefully walk the header up stable ladders and set it on the trimmers, nailing it through the back of the king studs (see Detail 1 of Fig.
A and Photo 3, adding new king studs and trimmer studs.