Kings


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Kings,

county, N.Y.: see BrooklynBrooklyn
, borough of New York City (1990 pop. 2,300,664), 71 sq mi (184 sq km), coextensive with Kings co., SE N.Y., at the western extremity of Long Island; an independent city from 1834, it became a New York borough in 1898.
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, borough.

Kings,

river, 125 mi (201 km) long, rising in three forks in the Sierra Nevada, E Calif., and flowing SW to Tulare Lake in the San Joaquin valley. Its middle and southern forks flow through the great gorges of Kings Canyon National ParkKings Canyon National Park,
461,901 acres (187,070 hectares), E central California. Largely wilderness, the park features summits of the High Sierra and two enormous canyons on the Kings River.
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. Part of the Central Valley project, the Kings River has been linked with the San Joaquin River; Pine Flat Dam (completed 1954) impounds a huge reservoir used for flood control, irrigation, and river regulation.

Kings,

books of the Bible, originally a single work in the Hebrew canon. They are called First and Second Kings in modern Bibles, and Third and Fourth Kingdoms in the Greek versions, where the books of Samuel are called First and Second Kingdoms. First and Second Kings cover the period c.1000 B.C.–c.586 B.C. and continue the historical narrative of First and Second Samuel, from the death of David to the destruction of Judah. The books are generally considered to belong to the Deuteronomic history (Joshua–2 Kings), in which existing sources were edited to describe and explain Israel's historical fate. The major divisions of First and Second Kings are as follows: first, the reign of Solomon, including the end of David's reign and a lengthy account of the Temple; second, a synchronizing parallel account of the two Hebrew kingdoms, beginning with the division between Rehoboam and Jeroboam and including the rise and fall of the house of Ahab of Israel, into which is woven the careers of the prophets Elijah and Elisha; and third, the end of the southern kingdom. First and Second Kings show Israel's kings leading the nation in its violation of the covenant between God and his people, thus bringing upon the nation the curses anticipated in chapters 27 and 28 of Deuteronomy. The events of Kings are told from a different point of view in Chronicles, which is an apologia for the Davidic monarchy.

Bibliography

See R. Nelson, 1 and 2 Kings (1987).

References in classic literature ?
My Lord King," he cried, "that you be my Lord King alone prevents Simon de Montfort from demanding satisfaction for such a gross insult.
Tense silence fell upon the little company of lords and courtiers as these awful words fell from the lips of a subject, addressed to his king.
I looked round to see who it was, then fell upon the ground in salutation, for before me was Unandi, mother of the king, who was named "Mother of the Heavens," that same lady to whom my mother had refused the milk.
The king looked at her and did not know her, but as they were such handsome fellows, he said: 'Yes,' and that he would willingly take them, and now they were the king's twelve huntsmen.
But the new King soon found, that during the long years he had been kept a prisoner in England his kingdom had fallen into wild disorder.
In came the Chief Steward, trying not to show the Nome King how frightened he was.
It was then to the sound of drums, trumpets, and vivats, that the young king crossed the threshold of that castle in which, seventy-two years before, Henry III.
Then he made a ball, and with these things he went the next day to the king.
They came to the King and asked him to keep them all the winter, to which he agreed.
The King and Queen dismounted from their steeds, ascended the steps of the royal box, and seated themselves upon two thrones, decked with purple and gold trapping, upon a dais sheltered by striped canvas.
asked the king, looking with admiration at these two men, whose chief idea seemed to be how they could take on their shoulders all the dangers that assailed him.
Somewhat calmer, D'Artagnan made every preparation for the journey, and took the greatest care that the military household of the king, as yet very inconsiderable in numbers, should be well officered and well disciplined in its meager and limited proportions.