knapweed


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

knapweed

any of several plants of the genus Centaurea, having purplish thistle-like flowers: family Asteraceae (composites)
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A member of the aster family that arrived from Europe in the late 17th century, brown knapweed spreads aggressively and renders the soil inhospitable for native species by releasing a chemical compound through the roots.
Establishment of native plant communities on sites infested by spotted knapweed (Centaurea maculosa Lam.
Myers (2007) suggested that knapweed populations did not significantly decline until the establishment of L.
Hicks, whose personal favourites are cornflowers and knapweed, wants to buck the trend.
Plants such as Corn Marigold, Corn Cockle, Camomile, Cambridge Milk Parsley, Field Scabious, Field Poppy, Greater Knapweed, Ox Eye Daisy, Ragged Robin, Teasel, along with meadow turf are ideal for attracting insects, with the added benefit of helping to ensure good pollination of flowers.
One plant Metlen is studying now, spotted knapweed, adds a root-war twist to the chemical-pounce scenario.
The wild area should have a dark roosting place and a variety of seed-producing weeds including knapweed, teasel and dandelion.
Protected by helmets, face guards, reinforced chaps, and steel-toed boots, or wrapped in goggles, gloves, and chemical-resistant Tyvek suits, mobile strike forces of Park Service recruits march into the woods in pursuit of targets with names like bittersweet, mile-a-minute vine, knapweed, and kudzu.
The one in particular I want to find is a mutant spineless Bull thistle (Cirsium), not the thistle look-a-like, knapweed.
Biological control agents were first introduced to control knapweed species in 1970, and now 11 species of insects have been introduced to North America for this purpose (Muller-Scharer 1991).
These plants include butterfly weed and other milkweeds, abelia, butterfly bush, Joe-pye weed, sweet William, lantana, lilac, thistle, knapweed, viper's bugloss, hawthorn, hydrangea, spirea, goldenrod, phlox, heliotrope, penta, sweet allysum, yarrow, dandelion, staghorn sumac, thymes, mints, oreganos and white clover.
Knapweed and other noxious invasives can then spread into these logged areas like wildfire, displacing the native grasses that elk rely upon.