knight errant

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knight errant

(esp in medieval romance) a knight who wanders in search of deeds of courage, chivalry, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Consider just the title, Monsignor Quixote, which leads the reader to automatically relate it to Cervantes's novel through the surname, but which, at the same time, introduces a certain confusion through the religious implications of the word 'Monsignor,' since the religious characters in Don Quijote were the main obstacles to Alonso Quijano becoming a knight-errant. Therefore, the reader wonders whether s/he is faced with a parody of Don Quijote or, on the contrary, a sequel to it.
And he comprehends that he should have a lady in order to become an authentic knight-errant. Cervantes narrates the scene as follows:
The first group of Tang unofficial prose accounts explores the tensions between female violence and proper femininity by turning the woman avenger into an unnamed knight-errant. These stories include "Qie bao fu yuan shi" (A concubine avenges her father's death) by Li Zhao (fl.
Man of La Mancha ranked high in my youth because, as with many boys, I got a kick out of the titular character, a funny and inspiring wannabe knight-errant named Don Quixote (though it didn't occur to me to look up "errant").
"I am Don Quijote, and my profession is knight-errant. My laws are to resolve wrongs, to lavish the good and to avoid evil.
The Chinese Knight-Errant. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
Colourful adaptation of the novel by Sir Walter Scott with Robert Taylor as the knight-errant who comes to the rescue of King Richard the Lionheart.
But it's the persona of the knight-errant that crowns his performance with implacable grace and dignity and heartrending sweetness.
In this paradigmatic text of early modernity, the protagonist's most profound desire is to be recognized, and not as another, but precisely as himself, as a knight-errant who has transcended the disenchantment of his age and learned to see beyond temporal parameters.
Many would agree that Carmelo, our dear Carmelo, like his beloved and deeply studied Don Quixote, was a Spanish "knight-errant" at heart.
Carroll Johnson confirms the transition from an imitative artistic representation to a more serious engagement with reality since "what begins as fun, an effort to turn life into a form of theater, ends by involving playactors in something deadly serious [...] [b]ecause the duke and duchess and all their servants make a great show of taking Don Quixote seriously and treating him as a real knight-errant" (66).
Wilson was fond of a hard drink and fond of good-looking women, tempting qualities that suggested a swashbuckling knight-errant. (Most men have Wilson's inclinations.