Knotter


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

Knotter

 

a continuous-action device for the preliminary removal of knots, incompletely processed chips, fiber bunches, and various large bodies from paper pulp. In a centrifugal knotter the cellulose fibers are passed through holes in a cylindrical sieve by means of the static pressure of the pulp and the centrifugal force resulting from the rotation of a rotor blade in the sieve. Vibration knotters consist of a trough with a perforated bottom, suspended in a reinforced-concrete basin. The sorted pulp passes through the holes of a sieve into the basin. Vibration transports knots and unprocessed chips along the trough; they are then washed away from the good fiber when the trough is removed from the apparatus. The water suspension used in the knotter contains 0.8–2.5 percent pulp by weight. The diameter of the holes in the sieve is 4–9 mm, and the total area of the sieve is up to 2 m2. Knotters can process up to 250 tons of pulp per day.


Knotter

 

a device for removing knots, clumps of fibers, poorly crushed particles, and other inclusions in paper pulp before the pulp is fed to a paper machine. The pulp is cleaned in the knotter as it passes through slits in rotating drums or through holes in sieves. The productivity of knotters reaches 170–230 tons per day for air-dry fiber.


Knotter

 

in textile production, a hand device or machine mechanism designed to tie knots in yarn ends when fixing breaks in the yarn or connecting yarns from two packs. A hand knotter makes the process of tying knots easier and reduces the time required for tying ends to 1 sec. The most commonly used type in the USSR was designed by M. V. Bashkirov and resembles a latch needle used in machine knitting. It has a base by which it is secured to each working position on a winder. Knotter mechanisms that automatically tie a knot and cut off the ends are the principal working part in knotting machines. They are capable of tying a knot in 0.15–0.25 sec.

References in periodicals archive ?
23) Ad Knotter in his wider comparison tabulates electoral data from East Rhondda that ends in 1945 along with data from Longwy that begins in 1959, by which time the parliamentary vote in virtually any constituency in Britain was less than half the average percentage in France as a whole.
Appleby is famous for perfecting the knotter mechanism that made twine tie binders possible and is still in use on today's square balers.
A celebration of transience, a paean to you-have-to-be-there, a deep and exhilarating bow to we only-have-now," signed by Professor Emeritus Yaffle Chucklebutty, noted Operatic Tenor and Sausage Knotter.
The packers, compression device and knotter are nearly identical to those in the original grain binder design.
Instead of holding the hay under compression while the knotter tied, knotters began working so fast they were able to tie the bale even as the plunger continued to work.
The gear teeth on the intermittent knotter gear then operates the disk driving pinion and turns the disk sufficiently to permit the twine holder to secure both strands of twine in the disk.
That's particularly true of the old grain or corn binders, which have many adjustable parts that determine the size of bundles, tightness of the string bank, placement of the band, or which have an automatic knotter.
The binder boss rode around the field in a buggy and made all adjustments or repairs, even down to knotting twine balls together and rethreading knotter needles.
They'd all been recalled because of a patent infringement with the International Harvester knotter.
My dad rode on the binder to work all the levers raising or lowering the cutting blades, to kick the pedal that let the bundles drop in piles, and to sweat over and cuss the knotter that tied the bundles neatly when it wasn't tangled in twine like a backwash of fishing line.
The first twine knotter was demonstrated in 1867 by John Appleby.