komatik


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komatik

a sledge having wooden runners and crossbars bound with rawhide, used by the Inuit and other related peoples
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the last IGA doctor ever to be transported on a medical emergency on a komatik pulled by eight dogs, Frankel was ambivalent about such means.
The vehicle can also haul over 400 kilograms on a towed komatik, making it highly utilitarian for soldiers and Canadian Rangers operating in the Arctic.
However, the system produces limited amounts of drinking water and is located a kilometre and a half away from the village and therefore not easily accessed by people who don't have komatiks or all-terrain vehicles.
Botwood recounted getting caught in a fierce storm with George Lilly, Frederick Butt, and Hector Snow when leaving Riverhead for Red Bay via komatik (a sled pulled by dogs).
Sleds (komatik in Inuktitut) were traditionally made of wood or whale bone.
When Nurse Kate disregards the advice of her komatik driver and sets off into a storm with another, she admits that she "was a little afraid that [she] was doing a Florence Nightingale sister-of-mercy act, but that was better than sitting down and doing nothing" (215).
The booth display included sample copies of books published in the Northern Lights and Komatik series that could be ordered at special conference rates, complimentary recent issues of Arctic, and a looping slideshow featuring images of AINA's many assets, such as research associate fieldwork, the Kluane Lake Research Station, the journal Arctic and other publications, and historical photos.
Snowmobiles and a sled (komatik) were used for travel and transport of the equipment on the ice-covered lake.
With little practice, Whelan was immediately faced with understanding a snowmobiler's techniques for hauling a loaded komatik with no brakes and navigating through rough terrain.
This design is similar to the komatik still used throughout the Canadian Arctic and West Greenland.
In 1989, the former Technical Papers evolved into the Komatik series, which would also be desktop-published.