kyphoscoliosis


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kyphoscoliosis

[¦kī·fō‚skō·lē′ō·səs]
(medicine)
Lateral curvature of the spine accompanied by rotation of the vertebrae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lung function in congenital kyphosis and kyphoscoliosis.
A neurofibromatosis type I patient with severe kyphoscoliosis and intrathoracic meningocele.
Some marfanoid features were noticed as moderate thoracic kyphoscoliosis, moderate hypermobility of all joints and skin hyperextensibility, positive thumb and wrist signs.
The gentleman had kyphoscoliosis due to long standing ankylosing spondylosis.
Callum, from Kings Heath, suffers from the spine deformity kyphoscoliosis.
A 12-year-old premenarchal girl presented with backpain due to dystrophic NF1 left thoracic kyphoscoliosis (Figure 1(a)).
Elderly patients and patients with liver atrophy, decreased fat tissue in the abdomen, kyphoscoliosis, atherosclerosis of the cystic artery, and increased peristalsis of neighboring organs were defined as predisposal factors (7-9).
Other authors (16,17) have described a phenotype defined by an early onset of symptoms, usually during the first year of life, consisting in progressive distal muscle weakness, sensitive loss, steppage gait, pes cavus, kyphoscoliosis, hammertoes, and reduced or absent reflexes.
CO2 retention as found in emphysema or muscular-spinal conditions such as kyphoscoliosis can cause significant blunting of CO2 response.
5 Kyphoscoliosis is one of the most common abnormalities of the spine with an estimated prevalence for mild deformity of 1 in 1000 people and for severe deformity of 1 in 10000 people in the United States.
It is also noted that while five of the six children had established kyphoscoliosis at initiation of CAM.
An increased rate of caesarean section is also reported which could be due to fetal distress, malpresentations and cephalopelvic disproportion due to undiagnosed pelvic neurofibromas and pelvic contractures including cases of kyphoscoliosis affecting the lower spine (sequelae of NF1) [6, 26].