lag

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lag

[lag]
(civil engineering)
A flat piece of material, usually wood, used to wedge timber or steel supports against the ground and to make secure the space between supports.
(electronics)
A persistence of the electric charge image in a camera tube for a small number of frames.
(physics)
The difference in time between two events or values considered together.

LAG

On drawings, abbr. for lagging.

lag

lagclick for a larger image
i. A delay or time interval in an instrument like the vertical speed indicator (VSI) or an altimeter between the actual event and its display. An altimeter lags in steep descent and very steep climbs, while some lag is inherent on all VSIs.
ii. The angular crankshaft movement between a reference position such as TDC (top dead center), BDC (bottom dead center), and the opening or closure of a valve. Also called valve lag.
iii. The angular movement between the helicopter hub and the temporary slower blade.
iv. The delay in the human reaction to an event.

lag

References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Smith became an apprentice lagger with Darlington Insulation after he left school in 1955.
I worked as a lagger years ago and spent a lot of time working out of town.
Debbie Brewer, 47, was exposed to asbestos by her father Philip Northmore when he was a lagger at Devonport Dockyard in 1966.
The Birmingham-born singer/ songwriter began work as a pipe lagger, spending his nights singing in pubs and writing poetry.
A RETIRED lagger and boiler operator died of an industrial disease, an inquest ruled.
One of the victims, Doreen Fox's husband Thomas worked as a lagger for insulation firm Joseph Naddin for two years in the 1950s.
He was a lagger for an industrial insulation firm for two years during the 1950s and then worked as a docker for 25 years.
Colin was diagnosed as suffering from asbestosis 40 years after he started work at Washington Chemical Company as a lagger.
Bono said: "I think he [Mr Ahern] should not go to Europe without a firm commitment that Ireland is going to get back in the lead and not be a lagger.
He worked as a lagger for industrial insulation firm Joseph Nadin for two years in the 1950s, before unloading cargo for 25 years as a docker in the city.
He said: "I think Bertie should go with a firm commitment that Ireland is going to get back in the lead and not be a lagger.