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lag

[lag]
(civil engineering)
A flat piece of material, usually wood, used to wedge timber or steel supports against the ground and to make secure the space between supports.
(electronics)
A persistence of the electric charge image in a camera tube for a small number of frames.
(physics)
The difference in time between two events or values considered together.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

LAG

On drawings, abbr. for lagging.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lag

lagclick for a larger image
i. A delay or time interval in an instrument like the vertical speed indicator (VSI) or an altimeter between the actual event and its display. An altimeter lags in steep descent and very steep climbs, while some lag is inherent on all VSIs.
ii. The angular crankshaft movement between a reference position such as TDC (top dead center), BDC (bottom dead center), and the opening or closure of a valve. Also called valve lag.
iii. The angular movement between the helicopter hub and the temporary slower blade.
iv. The delay in the human reaction to an event.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

lag

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References in periodicals archive ?
First, we assessed the relative manufacturing capabilities of Leaders and Laggers over each of the five dimensions of competitive capabilities.
"We are particularly keen to hear from laggers, welders, pipe fitters, electricians and general labourers, as these are the skills we will need as the second phase of construction begins.
"At Shield Bros, Mr Bullock''s job should not have required him to be exposed to asbestos, but he worked alongside laggers who were creating asbestos dust.
Teesside Coroner's Court heard that Mr Lewis had worked at a power station in Billingham during the 1950s, 60s and 70s and had frequently been covered in asbestos dust as laggers knocked old asbestos off pipes.
On the other hand, the day's laggers were MWC and Petron, which slipped by over 2 percent.
Charles Carr, a plasterer from Lansbury Gardens, Wardley, Gateshead, worked alongside laggers who were responsible for unpacking and mixing asbestos.
"Conditions when you were working alongside laggers were very dusty."
On the other hand, the day's laggers were Petron, MWC, FGEN, SMC, LTG and EDC.
New jobs could be available as loft laggers, architects, plumbers, builders, electricians, plasterers and insulation specialists.
New loft laggers, architects, plumbers, builders, electricians and plasterers would be needed.
He said when he was at Billingham ICI, laggers were working only 6ft away from him putting asbestos lagging around pipes.
Meanwhile, the day's biggest PSEi laggers were Petron (-2.31 percent), RLC (-1.4 percent) and AEV (-1.25 percent).