lament

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lament

a poem or song in which a death is lamented
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking to the topic of his address titled: Nigeria's Hour of Salvation is now,' the PPC national chairman, while lamenting the state of insecurity in the country, among others, enjoined all peace-loving compatriots and citizens to dump what he termed as the attitude of 'lukewarmness to active and meaningful participation in democratic processes not necessarily in politics.'
(29) "Not all the sentiments expressed were positive," as Bourke writes of these keens: "Some women poets gave vent to anger at powerful people, publicly criticized their own relatives and in-laws, and gave graphic accounts of personal violence and miserliness, all in the course of lamenting. They did so with relative impunity ..." with caoineadh demonstrating "the various ways Irish women poets could manipulate the themes and verbal formulas of the lament to construct and transmit a rhetoric of resistance to male domination in general." (30) They participate in a more widespread use of lament by women in funeral rituals "to articulate their own view of the world in opposition to men's," (31) with the scene of lament becoming an important public stage.
'Many firefighters get burned unnecessarily during rescue operations due to poor safety standards and machinery,' the All Pakistan Fire and Rescue Workers Association official said, lamenting that the lack of resources adds to the injuries of workers.
Lamenting lack of funds, he said that he does not have enough funds to initiate anti-epidemic spray drive in the city.
The background of any lamenting literary work is an important key to understanding the literary text itself.
On this occasion, women were lamenting the transposition of the ancient bodies from their resting place on the West bank of Luxor to an unknown destination just as in the context of contemporary belief, laments would have been required to accompany the deceased on their dangerous journey to the afterlife.
The present paper focuses on the genre and practice that have accompanied death and a number of liminal rites in general--laments and lamenting. Central to the discussion are examples of the said genre and practice in Balto-Finnic and North Russian cultural areas.
(40) Here Augustine confronts the mysterious and perplexing reality of the church, and by reflecting on the psalms of lament, he "actively appropriates for the church the groans which resound throughout the Psalter and indicates that, by lamenting with the Psalmist and reflecting deeply and continually on that affect, the church comes to learn what it is, comes to be what it is." (41) This argument about the ecclesiological significance and corporate labor of the church's lamenting is rooted for Augustine in the belief that psalms are "the voice of the whole Christ, head and body, the one voice of the Incarnate Word speaking to, with, and within the Church." (42) In the words of McCarthy, "In order to understand the psalms, the hearer must already be situated in the ecclesial body.
Through all of these essays runs the explicit or implicit suggestion that the purpose behind these laments is to encourage audience identification, and at times over-identification, with those who are lamenting. For instance, in "Christine de Pizan's Life in Lament," Nadia Margolis traces the historical causes for the many different types of heart-rending lament that Christine de Pizan penned over her life, ending with a discussion of Pizan's Heures de Contemplacion.
Bizarrely a spokesmen is lamenting the fact that modern man's "sedentary" lifestyle has forced them to stock 64" waist and 60" chest suits.
They cover lament and the phenomenon of suffering, the assault of lament on systematic thought, lamenting for God's sake, and lamenting in Christ.
This inattention imposes a grievous, even if uncounted, cost: where lament is precluded or censored, so are lamenting people.