laminar boundary layer

laminar boundary layer

[′lam·ə·nər ′bau̇n·drē ‚lā·ər]
(fluid mechanics)
A thin layer over the surface of a body immersed in a fluid, in which the fluid velocity relative to the surface increases rapidly with distance from the surface and the flow is laminar.

laminar boundary layer

laminar boundary layerclick for a larger image
A series of layers of airflow over a body with each successive layer having a higher velocity than the adjacent one and with the bottom-most layer having a zero velocity. The opposite of laminar airflow is turbulent airflow.
References in periodicals archive ?
Loitsyanskiy, Laminar Boundary Layer [in Russian], Fizmatgiz, Moscow, Russia, 1962.
Blasius equation describes the viscous flow in a laminar boundary layer over a flat plate.
9 and 10 illustrate, respectively, the obtained profiles of non-dimensional temperature and vertical velocity, for three different cooling temperature cases, along with the semi-analytical solution of LNCIVP problem, for the corresponding Prandtl number of the air.As it can be seen, the resulting non-dimensional temperature and vertical velocity profiles exhibit clearly a laminar boundary layer behavior, again confirming the proposed numerical approach.
Consider a steady of two-dimensional laminar boundary layer flow of an electrically conducting viscous incompressible dusty fluid over a semi-infinite surface.
Further, the flow in the laminar boundary layer is two-dimensional [14],
To reduce friction, a laminar boundary layer must be maintained as large as possible over the wetted surface.
Rana and Bhargava [31] illustrated the steady, laminar boundary layer flow due to the nonlinear stretching of a flat surface in a nanofluid.
The most distinctive works of Vajravelu and Hadjinicolaou [9] and Mehmood and Ali [10] are available in the literature describing the heat transfer characteristics in the laminar boundary layer of a viscous fluid over a linearly stretching continuous surface with variable wall temperature and the incompressible generalized three-dimensional viscous flow with heat transfer analysis in the presence of viscous dissipation generated due to uniform stretching of the plane wall, respectively.
Even for the case of a laminar flow, the exact solution of equations describing the laminar boundary layer is very difficult to calculate and only few simple problems can straightforward be analysed [1,3].
Boyd, "Momentum and heat transfer in a laminar boundary layer with slip flow," Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer, vol.
Configuration B pushes like a hand that is significantly wider than four fingers stuck together because the spacing is approximately the same as the thickness of the laminar boundary layer that surrounds each finger.