laminitis


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laminitis

(lăm'ənī`tĭs), also called founder, inflammation of the lamina, the innermost layer of the hoof wall in horses, ponies, and donkeys. Although the condition usually affects only the front feet, it may involve all four feet. Both acute and chronic forms occur. The laminae become inflamed because of congestion of blood and accumulation of toxins in the hoof region resulting from any of several causes, e.g., consumption of large quantities of grain; ingestion of large amounts of cold water by overheated horses; concussion during fast, hard road work; and toxemia following pneumonia or infection of the uterus. The signs of acute laminitis appear rapidly and include sweating, a rise in temperature to as high as 106°F; (62°C;), a pounding pulse in the digital artery to the involved hoof, an expression of anxiety, and a stance with the legs forward of their natural position so as to reduce the pain of weight bearing. Chronic laminitis is characterized by a shifting or rotation of the bone and other anatomical distortions in the hoof. The disease is treated by eliminating the causative factors, administering drugs for the acute form, and trimming hooves and fitting corrective horseshoes for the chronic form.
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Morphological changes of laminar tissue can be even observed in the prodromal phase of laminitis (POLLITT, 1996; LASKOSKI et al., 2009).
Locally, vaso-active molecules with inflammatory capacity are produced, generating other symptomatologies like laminitis. In the mammary gland there are alterations in nutrient availability, causing several changes, among them, the compositional quality of milk.
At Donaldson's we see a great many horses with laminitis throughout the year, but especially in the spring.
If too much starch and sugar overloads the cecum, the microbes will work overtime creating the colic producing gases in the gut along with dangerous levels of lactic acid, which is a precursor to the process causing laminitis in hooves.
They received veterinarian treatment for suspected laminitis and both seemed to stabilize.
It's a condition that can lead to laminitis and equine metabolic syndrome.
By studying hoof capsules, he realised that laminitis was probably present as a low-grade condition in many horses, and that it was possible to identify the signs.
Dennis Weisenbaugh, one of the plaintiffs, says that three of his horses that he rode in the area have had to be put down after suffering from laminitis, a foot inflammation.