lampoon

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lampoon

a satire in prose or verse ridiculing a person, literary work, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kevin Foster (back, second right) among David Cameron's new |Tory MPs and (inset) Foster lampooned as one half of Jedward
"I just have this thing that we are being lampooned on our own show and it just disturbs me a bit."
And David Blunkett at Works and Pensions is lampooned for daring to suggest that the best course of action for the long-term unemployed sick is to shift their shanks and get jobs.
Now that old-school totalitarian North Korea has entered contemporary cultural discourse--not only has the country been recognized as an integral member of the "Axis of Evil," but its dictator, Kim Jong Il, has been lampooned on Saturday Night Live--an examination of its art suddenly seems timely.
As the man who lampooned racial stereotypes in The Colored Museum and Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk, you must have been very aware that there were cliches you wanted to avoid with the character of Nanny.
I'd be remiss--or perhaps even lampooned in the funny papers--if I didn't welcome cartoonist Aaron McGruder and his crew Huey and Riley Freeman to the cover of Black Issues Book Review.
His 1995 comedy Canadian Bacon lampooned America's hawkish foreign policy, and his two TV series (TV Nation and The Awful Truth) satirized the media while blasting hypocrisy and bureaucracy in politics, business, and religion.
Gervais has relentlessly lampooned the Berkshire town in TV sitcom The Office, in which he stars as cringeworthy middle manager David Brent.
In 1992, after environmentalists lampooned his attempts to campaign as the "environmental candidate," George H.W.
Teaming up with artist Andrea Bjeldanes and composer Miles Anderson, McCaleb created Zona Rio, a hilarious romp that lampooned cultural contrasts and crossed genders.
Although the term came into use in the 17th century from the French, examples of the lampoon are found as early as the 3rd century BC in the plays of Aristophanes, who lampooned Euripides in Frogs and Socrates in Clouds.
She attained celebrity by burlesquing sentimental novels and by writing the same sorts of novels she had lampooned. The Female Quixote; or, The Adventures of Arabella (1752), which she dramatized in 1758 as Angelica; or Quixote in Petticoats, describes a young girl who tries to live like the heroines of fashionable French novels.