lancet window

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Related to lancet windows: lancet arch

lancet window

a narrow window having a lancet arch

lancet window

A narrow window with a sharp pointed arch that is typical of English Gothic architecture; one pane shaped in the form of a lancet window.
See also: French window

lancet window

[′lan·sət ‚win·dō]
(architecture)
A narrow window with a sharply pointed top.

lancet, lancet window

lancet
1. A narrow window with a sharp pointed arch typical of English Gothic architecture from ca. 1150 to ca. 1250.
2. One light shaped like a lancet window.

lancet window

A narrow window having the shape of a lancet arch.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the main bedroom, the light filters in through a traceried lancet window and large Velux window with a deep oak sill.
The apostles and their symbols feature in fourteen single lancet windows on the east and west walls of the nave starting from the choir stalls.
Three lancet windows in the former baptistery to the right depict Mary in the Temple with Joachim and Anne, the Baptism of Christ and the Presentation of infant Jesus at the Temple with Mary and Joseph.
It has north and south facing lancet windows, including one with stained glass that dates from 1886.
A lovely lancet window has beautiful views onto the garden and there are original beams with two carved stone corbels.
Beyond the tall hedging is pasture land, there is an old yew with an octagonal garden store, complete with lancet windows and a raised terrace with open outlook.
The reception hall has large glazed panels north and south in the hallway and in the dining room there are lancet windows north and south.
Originally built in 1880 for the private use of the nearby Saltmarshe Castle Estate, it has some intriguing architectural features including Gothic-style arched oak doors and lancet windows for a medieval flavour.
About 1.5 miles from the village of Brinklow with its inns, shops, post office and easy access to Rugby, four and a half miles away, the house has been properly renovated but retains the original interest of stone mullioned lancet windows and a period atmosphere.
A living room has a curved feature wall with more lancet windows and a living room kitchen has a wood burning stove, work surfaces and storage plus windows to two sides.
These include the neatly stone-edged lancet windows and the huge cart entrance, now glazed with double entrance doors but allowing light to soak into the central hall.
Too much light can be the enemy of the conservationist so the building has lancet windows while the famous map, lit by a low bank of fibre optic lights and two roof spotlights, shines out in semi-darkness in its own room.