landfall

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landfall

1. the act of sighting or nearing land, esp from the sea
2. the land sighted or neared

landfall

[′lan‚fȯl]
(navigation)
The first sighting of land when approaching from seaward; by extension, the term is sometimes used to refer to the first contact with land by any means, as by radar.
A navigational procedure in which an aircraft, after a relatively long overwater flight, turns on to a line of position passing through its destination and follows the line to the destination.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first was Sagar, which entered the Gulf of Aden and made landfall in western Somalia on May 19, making it the country's strongest and westernmost tropical cyclone in records dating to the mid-1960s.
This might suggest that we are due for a major landfall this season, but recent research by Timothy Hall from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies and ACE Tempest Re's Kelly Hereid show that the probability of ending the streak is independent of drought duration.
Only three other seasons in the United States since 1900 involved five or more landfalls. For a season when three major storms (Category 3 or greater) hit Florida, there is no precedent since 1851.
In a pilot project using the records of a province near Hong Kong, Liu has compiled a 1,000-year record of typhoon landfalls. It reveals variations in hurricane frequency on the scale of centuries as well as decades.
Florida had 57 hurricanes make landfall in that time span, including 24 that were Category Ill or higher, while Texas was hit by 36 hurricanes.
Previous surveys by university ecologists showed old landfalls to be best at growing weeds, even after 20 years.
Of special concern are the rare instances of tropical cyclones that intensify rapidly just before landfall, catching forecasters and populations off guard, thereby risking large casualties.
Marce first made landfall over Siargao Island on Thursday afternoon.
Higher sea-surface temperatures (SST) are expected to enhance the hurricane landfall risk for locations across the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts by up to 10%, according to new mid-hurricane season research from AIR Worldwide Corporation that reflects an alternate view to its standard data catalog.
The landfall site picked by EDC was on the isolated Ecuadorian coastline near Machala, lying south of the Galapagos Islands made famous by Charles Darwin.
Isabel, the costliest tropical cyclone of the 2003 Atlantic Hurricane Season, strengthened to a Category 5 storm over water before weakening and making landfall near Drum Inlet, North Carolina as a Category 2 hurricane.