landform


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landform

[′lan‚fȯrm]
(geography)
All the physical, recognizable, naturally formed features of land, having a characteristic shape; includes major forms such as a plain, mountain, or plateau, and minor forms such as a hill, valley, or alluvial fan.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the various techniques Master Judith is learned and practiced in, she goes on to offer her knowledge on Landform feng shui and San He feng shui as her areas of expertise, and as the techniques that together provide the most complete reading of a property to showcase its prospects.
The stunning human landform sculpture of a reclining lady is made of 1.5m tonnes of rock, clay and soil, and is 100ft high and a quarter of a mile long.
Based on the brightness and extent of its rays and secondary craters, 96-km-wide Copernicus is the youngest large landform in this area.
As these are mentioned, corresponding photos are projected and identified so that every child has a basic idea of all the landforms elicited from their classmates.
General linear models for unbalanced analyses of variance, which are designed for unbalanced datasets, were conducted to test the main and interactive effects of landform, land use and soil type on soil properties.
The landform has been created with 1.5 tonnes of rock, earth, stone and clay.
In this study, sandy soils extending to at least 200 cm below the surface ("deep sand") were classified as the sand lake plain, a landform collectively represented by deposits of different origins including deltas, beach ridges, and dunes.
Students were required to choose an indigenous story that made reference to an Australian landform. Following this, they were required to design and perform a science experiment or model that helped them understand the geological reference in the story (see Appendix 2 for the task).
To accomplish this, a geoscientist first dates a set of rock samples from the present surface, then reasons backward to deduce what process affected the original landform. This is a difficult deduction: geological processes take place over an extremely long period of time, and evidence remaining today is scarce and noisy.