Landmark

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landmark

[′lan‚märk]
(cell and molecular biology)
Any distinctive feature that can be used to identify a chromosome.
(engineering)
Any fixed natural or artificial monument or object used to designate a land boundary.
(navigation)
A conspicuous natural or artificial object near or on land, other than an established aid to navigation, and observable by eye or radar; used in the piloting type of navigation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Landmark

Any building structure or place that has a special character or special historic or aesthetic interest or value as part of the heritage or cultural characteristics of a city, state, or nation.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

landmark

1. Any building, structure, or place that has a special character, special historic interest, and/or special aesthetic interest, or value, as part of the development, heritage, or cultural characteristics of a nation, state, city, or town.
2. A monument, fixed object, or marker on the ground that designates the location of a land boundary.
3. A formal designation of such status for a building by a national or local authority. Also see National Historic Landmark and National Register of Historic Places.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jaffe also believes landmarking conveys status to a building in certain owners' eyes.
City of New York upheld the city's landmarks law, with the majority insisting the landmarking and denial of permission to build a tower wasn't a taking because the city provided a way to transfer development rights and did not impede existing uses or prevent a reasonable return on investment.
Now that the City Council inherited the Board of Estimate's power over landmarking, preservationists like Taylor are a bit nervous.
The court ruled said that landmarking decisions could not be compromised.
Eisland said she is a proponent of landmarks, but proposed designations, she said, are sometimes "overreaching." While Eisland also voted against the landmarking of the Antonin Dvorak House, she voted in favor of the Tribeca Historic District.