Landlord

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Landlord

 

Russian, lendlord), in medieval England a largescale feudal landowner, a lord. With the growth of the capitalist agrarian system, the landlord has become a large-scale capitalist landowner in Great Britain, the recipient of capitalist ground rent.

References in periodicals archive ?
The adjudication involves the cooperation of landowners and a strong government interest to clarify landownership boundaries.
Major themes are economic history, property law and legal culture, and landownership practices.
The French too, like the British, instituted private landownership in Indochina by the beginning of the twentieth century.
Such changes in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Gillespie warns, must not be seen as a single revolution concerned with "dispossession and expropriation," but rather as the products of linked revolutions in areas of everyday life such as the economy and the legal structure, the rise in literacy, changing patterns of landownership, agricultural developments, and the rise of towns.
Among their topics are the development of capitalist landownership in Egypt, the main components of the large landholding class, the relations of production in the countryside, and the large landowners and the social question.
Asher makes the important point that the Colombian state tied collective landownership protection to environmental stewardship.
Unlike private land, national forest landownership doesn't change and our trees have gotten larger compared (to private lands).
A high concentration of landownership is a major constraint to agricultural growth and alleviation of poverty.
The next chapter turns to the importance of landownership in Robeson County in shaping Indian identity and the political divisions that were fracturing the Croatan community.
The Color of the Land: Race, Nation, and the Politics of Landownership in Oklahoma, 1832-1929, by David A.
More broadly, through its operation on land, the law of abandonment facilitates a unique role for landownership as a mechanism for spreading and enforcing norms of obligation.