barrier

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barrier

1. 
a. an exposed offshore sand bar separated from the shore by a lagoon
b. (as modifier): a barrier beach
2. that part of the Antarctic icecap extending over the sea

Barrier

 

(in Russian, zaval), an antitank, antitransport, or anti-infantry obstacle. Barriers are made of lumber, stones, or snow on probable enemy routes of travel in places where it is difficult to bypass them. When setting up a timber barrier, trees of more than 20 cm in diameter are used. They are sawed down at a height of 60–120 cm and piled criss-cross with the crowns facing the enemy. In order to make it difficult to pull the barrier apart, the trees are not completely separated from their stumps; they are secured to them, woven with barbed wire, and also reinforced by the placement of land mines and high-explosive charges. During the Great Patriotic War of 1941–45 timber barriers were used extensively by Soviet troops on the defense in forested regions. Stone barriers are set up in mountains or in populated areas by demolishing cliffs or urban stone structures. Barriers made of snow can be devised in mountain and northern regions. In mining the Russian word zaval signifies the accidental destruction of a large rock mass in a mining excavation that disrupts its normal use.


Barrier

 

a lifting or sliding beam, usually installed at a railroad crossing to stop automobile, cart, and pedestrian traffic prior to the passing of a train. Barriers may be operated manually, mechanically, or automatically. Automatic barriers are operated by signals from the railroad’s automation and remote control systems; signal lights and acoustic devices may be used. The normal position for automatic barriers is the open position; for nonauto-matic barriers it is the closed position.

What does it mean when you dream about a barrier?

A barrier may signify that the dreamer is experiencing some obstacle in an arena of his or her life.

barrier

[′bar·ē·ər]
(ecology)
Any physical or biological factor that restricts the migration or free movement of individuals or populations.
(navigation)
Anything which obstructs or prevents passage of a craft.
(physics)

Barrier

[′bar·ē·ər]
(ordnance)
A passive acoustic detection system for submarines, consisting of hydrophones positioned on the ocean floor and connected by undersea cable to a land-based computer center.

barrier

1. Same as barricade.
2. According to the Architectural Barriers Act, any obstacle to the accessibility of a building by disabled people.

barrier

barrierclick for a larger image
i. As it relates to the sound barrier, it is a barrier to flight encountered by an airplane designed for subsonic speeds when it reaches transonic speeds and meets the turbulence incident of diverse degrees of compressibility. Intense buffet and loss of controls to a varying degree may be experienced at this speed.
ii. A net forming part of an arrester, or crash barrier system meant to arrest forward motion of an aircraft that is likely to overshoot the runway. Normally, the net lies horizontally on the ground and is raised when required. The vertical ropes of the barrier net are made of nylon, which are attached to the steel ropes at the top and the bottom of the barrier net.
References in periodicals archive ?
Police diversity adviser Maria Watson said: "We've had an overwhelmingly positive response from West Midlands officers already using the aid and the fact it is now being trialled by police forces abroad demonstrates how it helps overcome language barriers.
language barriers force Polish workers into 'ghettos'
It has been shown that language barriers in health and social care are detrimental to the quality of the services provided," said Llais co-director Gwerfyl Roberts.
Keywords: language barriers, immigrant, socio-economic status, welfare service, Hispanic, Haitian, English fluency
In essays about overcoming language barriers to healthcare, these women and other immigrants captivate readers with their tales of anguish and resourcefulness.
But even language barriers do not prevent adventurous travelers from heading for other remote areas of the world, such as Croatia, Tunisa, and Egypt (all outrank Japan in annual number of visitors).
Language barriers are another major roadblock, while the size and complexity of the industry itself, combined with limited governmental resources, require new inspection and enforcement strategies to protect public and worker safety.
Beginning with an introduction to the political environment, the acquisition organizations, systems, and processes involved, Kausal and Markowski describe the effects of differences in national culture and traditions, time zones, currencies, fiscal year schedules, and language barriers.
Translating marketing materials and advertisements into various languages and hiring multilingual staff are some of the ways insurers are attempting to break down language barriers with customers.
The special service allows clear telephone interpreting for those needing to overcome any language barriers to public transport information.
It's a great way to engage--and flirt--across language barriers," offers Gladstone.
Language barriers and lack of understanding are a factor in fatalities, particularly with Hispanic employees," Clark noted.

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