languet


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languet

An ornamental band, often enriched, consisting of a series of upright, tongue-shaped elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
minusve languet of the manuscript tradition along with Kiessling 1958, 521; Romano 1991,422; and Mankin 1995, 37.
Languet feared that his protege had overstepped the mark.
44) Voir Nelson-Martin Dawson, Le paradoxal destin d'un catechisme a double nationalite: l'histoire du manuel de Monseigneur Languet a Sens et a Quebec (these de doctorat, Universite Laval, 1989), 2 vol.
Dawson, Nelson-Martin, Crise d'Autorite et Clientelisme: Mgr Jean Joseph Languet de Gergy et la bulle Unigenitus.
On the subject of tyranny and popular revolt, Sidney echoes the sentiments of Thomas Randolph and George Buchanan, and of du Plessis Mornay and Languet, and others describing the complexities of the Dutch revolt against Philip II.
Where Worden excels is in his ability to weave into his discussion passages from Arcadia alongside relevant quotes from other Sidney documents (such as the Apology for Poetry), remarks from Sidney's English aristocratic circle (for example, Fulke Greville is repeatedly and cogently cited), and from his intellectual milieu (Hubert Languet, the ambassador of Augustus of Saxony).
Charles de l'Ecluse was close friend of Languet's and with him formed part of the Melanchthonian network so well described by Beatrice Nicollier in her recent Languet biography.
In his pamphlet Vindiciae contra Tyrannos,[18] Languet presents tyranny as an inevitable precursor to sedition.
He was especially close to Hubert Languet, the French diplomat who served as Sidney's father-figure, since Sir Henry Sidney spent most of his time attending to his duties in Ireland.
Yet it is particularly noticeable in this case that Sidney's political skills appeared to be at their most effective when communicated through the written word; and, as Hubert Languet pointed out, under the firm direction of more experienced men--paper and ink acting, as it were, as a kind of cloak for his (potentially) less controlled personal presence.
Unlike such contemporaries as Hubert Languet (1549-1623), Montaigne generally dismisses the idea that a subject can claim a freedom to resist lawful authority.
Nelson Dawson retrace la double vie, francaise et canadienne du catechisme de Mgr Languet (these 1989).