lantern clock


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lantern clock

[′lan·tərn ‚kläk]
(horology)
A wall-mounted clock with weights and pendulum outside the case.
A 17th-century clock characterized by a dome and open fretwork.
References in periodicals archive ?
An early 18th century brass lantern clock sold for PS2,500 and Eastern works of art attracted the usual interest with a Japanese embroidered screen at PS1,800, an Anglo-Indian horn tea caddy at PS1,600, a Chinese noir glazed vase at PS750 and a Japanese ivory carving at PS720.
The brass lantern clock, made by William Bowyer in 1623, is engraved with a Memento Mori scene of a skeleton on one side and on the other, Chronus, the Greek god of time, walking with his scythe.
A simple, but in its own way beautiful antique alarum lantern clock, it had been pooh-poohed by the huddle of dealers at our local Saturday village hall auction.
Examples of Birmingham-made clocks in Joe McKenna's book, far left, a longcase clock by Thomas Brown circa 1750; above, a lantern clock made by George Guest bedtween 1690 and 1710; Author Joe McKenna by the Chamberlain Clock moved in 1979 from Aston Cross to its present home at at the junction of High Street and Union Street
One of the first house clocks was made in the shape of a lantern and was called a lantern clock.
Lantern clock production lasted barely 150 years and, being made entirely by hand, they were thus expensive.
Other items taken included two Georgian 12in silver candlesticks and a Georgian 14in brass lantern clock.
Marine chronometers as well as carriage, bracket and mantel clocks also feature strongly in the sale which also includes a particularly attractive lantern clock by William Reeve of Spalding which, despite dating to around 1690, has survived in remarkably original condition and is estimated to realise between pounds 2,500 and pounds 3,500.
This German lantern clock was made in the late 19th or early 20th century and is a modern reproduction of the 17th century original.
Such a concentrated effort resulted in a distinctive local style of lantern clock, an example of which, pictured right, is to be offered at Dreweatt Neate, Bristol on Tuesday.
pounds 3,800 was paid by a Saudi Arabian buyer for a fine French ormolu and marble GrecoEgyptian Revival five-piece mantel clock garniture circa 1870, and the same price was taken for an English brass balance wheel lantern clock circa 1650 by Luke Cockedge, an unrecorded West Country maker.
For the collector of early clocks there is a West Country balance wheel lantern clock circa 1650, signed ``Luke Cockedge Fecit'' who appears to be an unrecorded maker.