lapdog

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lapdog

a pet dog small and docile enough to be cuddled in the lap
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
He also disagreed with those who think that bets backed by the administration would become lapdogs of the President.
"They are lapdogs who have become a fig leaf….if it was possible by some process to transform a lapdog into a fig leaf," he said.
Palin claimed that she expects that the negative tone of the campaign to "get even worse" in the coming months, thanks to the Democratic Party and "their lapdogs" in the media.
But perhaps it is to be expected - many lapdogs seem to be more faithful to their masters the more they get kicked in the teeth.
The fact remains that the Conservatives and their Lib Dem lapdogs remain in complete denial about the obvious fact that their friends the bankers caused the global credit crunch and that there is a fiscal debt crisis in virtually every country in Europe and that the vast majority of money borrowed by the Labour government was used to keep the financial capital, upon which the banks were built, afloat after years of bonuses and reckless greed.
All we have is the Tories and their lapdogs. During the election campaign the Tories by accident let out that they hated the NHS, so why is everybody so surprised they are trying to destroy it?
Conceptual art exhibition "Lapdogs of the Bourgeoisie" blurs fiction and reality at several turns.
IN HIS REVIEW OF LAPDOGS: How the Press Rolled Over for Bush, [July/August 2006] Todd Gitlin writes that the phony accusation that Al Gore claimed to have invented the Internet appeared in the media more than 4,800 times during the 2000 presidential campaign.
If we grade "Lapdogs" against the five W's of good journalism, then it gets an A for the "what" and a C for the "why."
Putting on the dog, meaning "to make a display of wealth or importance, especially by dressing stylishly and flashily" actually comes from the ancient custom of noble women sporting lapdogs. The silky-haired Maltese was the top dog in ancient Greece and Rome, while the Chinese (quite understandably) had a preference for the Pekingese, their yappie little skeletons having been discovered in 2,000-year-old tombs.
While the Big Media "watchdogs" performed as obedient lapdogs for the Clinton administration's coverup, a small band of resolute truth seekers broke loose one major story after another.