lapidary


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lapidary

[′lap·ə‚der·ē]
(science and technology)
Of or pertaining to precious stones.
The art of cutting precious stones.
A person skilled in such art.
References in periodicals archive ?
87m) when it took the Lapidary Project on board - mainly to buy machinery and provide the training to set up workshops.
The items in that article were dealt with strictly as mineral specimens, not as examples of the lapidary or jewelry arts.
Lynne demonstrated her business leadership skills during a recently concluded two-year knowledge transfer programme with londonbased Holts lapidary which creates fine gemstone jewellery designs.
As a retired gunsmith and amateur lapidary, I often have had to "unglue" things such as metal from stone and metal from metal.
Where Coontz's history gives a picture of marriage painted in broad strokes, Promises I Can Keep is a close-up, lapidary study of unmarried low-income mothers in eight of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods, culled from interviews with 162 such women over the course of five years.
In his spare time, Blauser enjoyed lapidary, searching beaches or the High Desert for stones that he crafted into rings, brooches, necklaces, belt buckles and bolo ties.
His writings, marked by their double impact of long soaring sentences and sudden lapidary epigrams, were as practical as his life.
Among the Umbrella commissions were Charles Linehan's Disintegration Loops, a quartet quite up to this low-key choreographer's usual high of intense yet subtly nuanced human interaction, and fellow Brit Russell Maliphant's Choice, a quintet of lapidary craftsmanship danced with molten cool and enhanced no end by the lighting genius of regular collaborator Michael Hulls.
It is not only by dint of compliment that Lorrain refers to Barbey's writings as "tresors"; in the form of a collection of gems and precious stones, treasure is a fundamental trope in Barbey's oeuvre and it is likely that Lorrain understood the relevance of lapidary metaphors in Barbey's text.
Johnson said, "In lapidary inscriptions a man is not upon oath.