lararium

lararium

In Roman houses, a small shrine to the household gods (lares).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Un lararium tipo aediculum, con nicho absidial, cupula gallonada y podium decorado con imitaciones marmoreas, procedente tambien de la casa excavada en la c/Palomeque [Caes.
Otro lararium, hallado en este caso in situ en la Casa de la Fortuna de Bilbilis [Bil.
On the back wall of a niche in a lararium on the wall of a Pompeian stable (IX.2.24) we find what many have taken to be a painting of an Isis-Epona.
Elsewhere in Pompeii on the wall of apistrinum (IX.3.10-12) was a fresco which may have depicted Isis and Epona flanking a lararium niche.
(90) Similarly, accordingly to the admittedly questionable account in the Historiae Augusta, the emperor Alexander Severius (208-235) positioned in his private oratory (lararium) images of Abraham and Christ before those of other renowned persons like Orpheus and Appolonius of Tyana.
According to the same source, indeed, Severus Alexander in his lararium on Mount Palatine worshipped together, in a syncretistic fashion, Christ, Abraham, Orpheus, and Apollonius of Tyana (Vit.
(17) Most famously the depiction in the 'House of the Sarno Lararium', I.14.7: Frohlich 1991:262-63 (= catalogue number L33) and pl.
The lararium (shrine to the household gods or lares) in the peristyle of the House of the Tragic Poet (Fig.
The quality of the modelling, and the precious materials from which the bull was made, suggest that it may have been a votive offering, perhaps to Jupiter, and could have stood in a lararium (household shrine) for private worship.
Assuming a lararium of Augustus, or of any Augustus, made good sense in a building which had the highest concentration of imperial statuary in Corinth but for the theater.