larceny

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larceny,

in law, the unlawful taking and carrying away of the property of another, with intent to deprive the owner of its use or to appropriate it to the use of the perpetrator or of someone else. It is usually distinguished from embezzlementembezzlement,
wrongful use, for one's own selfish ends, of the property of another when that property has been legally entrusted to one. Such an act was not larceny at common law because larceny was committed only when property was acquired by a "felonious taking," i.e.
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 and false pretenses in that the actual taking of the property is accomplished unlawfully and without the victim's consent (see robberyrobbery,
in law, felonious taking of property from a person against his will by threatening or committing force or violence. The injury or threat may be directed against the person robbed, his property, or the person or property of his relative or of anyone in his presence at
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); along with the taking there must be a carrying-off. It is also distinguished from burglaryburglary,
at common law, the breaking and entering of a dwelling house of another at night with the intent to commit a felony, whether the intent is carried out or not. This definition has been generally adopted with some modifications in the criminal law of the various states
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 in that the theft does not necessarily involve unlawful breaking and entering. Statutes in some states of the United States enlarge the scope of larceny to include embezzlement and false pretenses. Grand larceny, usually a felonyfelony
, any grave crime, in contrast to a misdemeanor, that is so declared in statute or was so considered in common law. In early English law a felony was a heinous act that canceled the perpetrator's feudal rights and forfeited his lands and goods to the king, thus depriving
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, is distinguished from petty larceny, usually a misdemeanormisdemeanor,
in law, a minor crime, in contrast to a felony. At common law a misdemeanor was a crime other than treason or a felony. Although it might be a grave offense, it did not affect the feudal bond or take away the offender's property. By the 19th cent.
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, by the value of the property stolen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Robbers' rearrest rate was 70.2 percent, larcenists' was 74.6 percent, and burglars' was 74 percent.
The Bureau of Justice Statistics conducted two studies on recidivism rates in the United States in 1983 and 1994.According to the most recent study in 1994, "released prisoners with the highest rearrest rates were robbers (70.2%), burglars (74.0%), larcenists (74.6%), motor vehicle thieves (78.8%), those in prison for possessing or selling stolen property (77.4%), and those in prison for possessing, using, or selling illegal weapons (70.2%)." Furthermore, "the 272,111 offenders discharged in 1994 had accumulated 4.1 million arrest charges before their most recent imprisonment and another 744,000 charges within 3 years of release." PATRICK A.
Larcenists were not a "protected class" for purposes of equal protection analysis, and consequently regulation of larcenists was presumptively allowed.
Big mistake, for while his fellow larcenists assure him nobody will get hurt, it's not long before the bodies start piling up.
In the end, this does make one wonder whether Israel is after all only a nation of larcenists and thugs.
That rhetorical question turns tit-for-tat practitioners into larcenists. Under such circumstances, public morality even in quest of stability for property--could require some kind of restitutionary gesture, or at least some acknowledgment of past injustice.