Laryngology

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laryngology

[‚lar·əŋ′gäl·ə·jē]
(medicine)
The science of anatomy, physiology, and diseases of the larynx.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Laryngology

 

the branch of otorhinolaryngology that deals with the structure, physiology, and pathology of the larynx and with the treatment and prevention of laryngeal diseases.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It would assist laryngologists to gauge the level of improvement due to the treatment.
Encourage creating a relationship with a laryngologist when one is healthy, prior to experiencing voice problems, allowing the physician to become acquainted with one's speaking/singing voice in "normal, healthy" mode.
The exclusion criteria were (1) the presence of cerebrovascular diseases shown by MRI (1.5 T), (2) the presence of laryngological diseases as diagnosed by a laryngologist, and (3) previous administration of donepezil or another ChEI.
Mitchell, a pediatric laryngologist at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond.
Hoarseness should be investigated by a laryngologist if it does not respond to usual prescriptions and persists beyond the time when general health is restored; that is, for more than three weeks.
Schnitzler, born to a noted Viennese laryngologist in 1862, pursued the medical career expected of him dutifully but without enthusiasm, abandoning it as soon as he was able to support himself with his writing.
Richard Stasney, M.D., a laryngologist and leader of the new center.
Weir Mitchell, Spanish neurobiologist Santiago Ramon y Cajal, British general practitioner Arthur Conan Doyle, and Austrian laryngologist Arthur Schnitzler.
Lem's father went on to become a successful (and therefore rather wealthy) laryngologist in Lwow.
Because one can be fairly certain that a prescription of voice rest will not result in injury to the voice, it also may be a comforting course for the laryngologist who is not intimately familiar with the techniques and latitudes of vocal performance demands.
The laryngologist faces the challenge and responsibility of accurate analysis and selection of the proper management.