laser sintering


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Related to laser sintering: stereolithography, Selective laser sintering

laser sintering

Building prototypes and finished parts in a machine from powdered thermoplastics and metals that are cured by heat from a laser. From CAD drawings that have been cross sectioned into thousands of layers, the machine builds up the part by curing one layer at a time. Powder is added for the next layer, and at the end of the job, the excess powder is removed and recycled for the next product. Also called "selective laser sintering" (SLS), it is one of several additive fabrication technologies used in rapid prototyping and rapid manufacturing. See 3D printing for an overview of the major methods.


Metal Laser Sintering
The EOSINT system from Electro Optical Systems (EOS) uses a laser beam to fuse metal powder into solid parts layer by layer. A variety of powders can be used from light steel alloys to strong composites. This water pump part was made from EOS MaragingSteel powder, which is an iron-based steel alloy that is known for its durability. The part was cut open to show its inner channels. (Images courtesy of EOS GmbH, www.eos.info)


Metal Laser Sintering
The EOSINT system from Electro Optical Systems (EOS) uses a laser beam to fuse metal powder into solid parts layer by layer. A variety of powders can be used from light steel alloys to strong composites. This water pump part was made from EOS MaragingSteel powder, which is an iron-based steel alloy that is known for its durability. The part was cut open to show its inner channels. (Images courtesy of EOS GmbH, www.eos.info)







Plastic Laser Sintering
This plastic shock absorber prototype was created in a 3D Systems Sinterstation. Plastic laser sintering is widely used for making prototypes for evaulating a design concept as well as to determine if the part works properly with other parts. For short runs, laser sintering is also used to make finished, plastic parts. (Image courtesy of 3D Systems, Inc., www.3dsystems.com)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Snap-fits are a current connection element for laser sintering. However, adequate rules for the design layout are still missing.
Selective laser sintering (SLS) machines are capable of using a variety of materials, so they can be useful in a variety of metalcasting facilities.
The laser sintering segment is projected to be the fastest-growing technology in the next five years.
Until now, primarily soft, elastic materials and rigid thermoplastics, such as polyamide, were commercially available for selective laser sintering. "Our TPU products, with their high toughness, elasticity and strength, have now closed the gap between these material classes.
Selective laser sintering (SLS) produces parts by partial melting or sintering together, with a laser beam, successive layers of powder material.
EOS GmbH, a German manufacturer of laser-sintering systems, recently interviewed industry experts during the K 2007 (Dusseldorf) and Euromold 2007 (Frankfurt) shows, asking participants about their predictions regarding future production trends with laser sintering and e-manufacturing.
"The laser sintering process gives the opportunity to build something that you can't easily create with pattern equipment," said Becket.
In November 2014, GE released a video of an engineer at the company using an EOS M 270 3-D printer to redesign a radio-controlled engine using the direct metal laser sintering technique.
North Carolina-based FineLine provides stereolithography, selective laser sintering and direct metal laser sintering services to corporate customers in the medical, aerospace, computer/electronics, consumer products and industrial machinery industries.
The egg was manufactured via the Laser sintering process.
Last summer, the world's first unmanned air vehicle (UAV) whose entire structure was produced by laser sintering of nylon, was flown by engineers at the University of Southampton, England.

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