laser tweezers


Also found in: Medical.

laser tweezers

[′lā·zər ‚twē·zərz]
(optics)
A laser trap used to hold microscopic organisms and their organelles and move them through the objective of an optical microscope without apparent damage. Also known as optical tweezers.
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Tenders are invited for Supply of Optical laser tweezers.
A new set of laser tweezers offers scientists unprecedented control over objects just tens of billionths of a meter in size.
The NanoTracker operates with laser tweezers and can trap, track and detect nanoparticles solely with light.
Potential additions to the stratum structure include the simultaneous use of laser tweezers, a photoactivation unit, and multiple epi-fluorescence turrets.
The available microscope port also enables system modification for alternate applications, with potential add-ons, such as optical trap laser tweezers, for high-precision micromanipulation of microscopic particles, or an additional camera for high-resolution imaging.
Beyond GEM4, however, there are other consortia of mission-complementary higher ed partners now applying atomic force microscopy, laser tweezers, and nanoscale staples to spur new discoveries in human genome experimentation--fighting diseases like botulism, malaria, sickle cell anemia, and pancreatic cancer.
Contract award: institute of molecular and translational medicine lf up - mikrodisektor fluorescent laser with laser tweezers.
His ExxonMobil coworker Zhengdong Cheng then put a solution containing the disks under a microscope and illuminated the sample with laser tweezers.
At a time when current antibiotics are becoming less effective against bacteria, researchers are turning to laser tweezers to aid against antibiotic resistance.
7] report one of the first studies that uses laser tweezers to detect the binding of an antigen to an immobilized antibody and applies this technique in a competitive immunoassay to determine antigen concentration.
This time, the researchers attached a bead to each end of a DNA molecule, with one end held fast by suction and the other slowly pulled away using laser tweezers.
For Buican, the snap reaction paid off nicely: He eventually left Los Alamos to help found Cell Robotics, Albuquerque, NM, a company that now markets a laser tweezers that attaches to commercial microscopes.