lasing


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lasing

[′lāz·iŋ]
(optics)
Generation of visible or infrared light waves having very nearly a single frequency by pumping or exciting electrons into high-energy states in a laser.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such grids--called distributed feedback structures--are known to produce the optical effects required for lasing, but the researchers took it one step further.
The percentage of lasing and pausing times were calculated for each procedure.
WGM lasing from blue colloidal liquid has been demonstrated in ternary CdZnS/ZnS alloyed core/shell QDs, and quasi-disk WGM microlasers have been realized via a simple modification of the surface tension of water, which deforms the lasing cavity, and this deformation can be used to modify the lasing peaks [42].
But without any tricks, dark mode lasing would be quite useless because the light is essentially trapped at the nanoparticle array and cannot leave", adds staff scientist Tommi Hakala.
Interestingly, microcavities can be realized by randomly embedding [Ba.sub.2]La[F.sub.7]:[Yb.sup.3+], [Er.sup.3+] nanocrystals inside the glass and random lasing action can be achieved in the glass ceramic.
It can occur by single pass gain through high gain ZnO thin films, exciton-exciton scattering with P-band lasing, electron-hole plasma, surface undulations, P-band lasing assisted with index guiding through top-down microstructuring, random lasing, exciton-polariton interaction, or by coherent reflections from parallel hexagons.
Thus, it can be concluded that the lasing should originate from WG cavity at low pump intensity and F-P cavity at high pump intensity.
Thus, the dielectric environment around the nanoparticle arrays can be tuned, which also tunes the lasing wavelength.
* Solid state Lasers have a lasing medium that is solid crystal, like the ruby laser or the neodymium YAG laser, which emits 1.06 micrometer wavelength.
All the above can be explained by that as the current increases the number of carriers supplied to the active region required to start lasing is reached faster and the turn-on delay decreases.
The two new lasers, developed by a team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego, require very low power to operate, which is an important breakthrough since lasers usually require greater and greater "pump power" to begin lasing as they shrink to nano sizes.
"They've shown that you can do lasing action in a live cell without destroying the cell," says physicist Stefan Hell of the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Gottingen, Germany.