last

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last

1
the wooden or metal form on which a shoe or boot is fashioned or repaired

last

2
a unit of weight or capacity having various values in different places and for different commodities. Commonly used values are 2 tons, 2000 pounds, 80 bushels, or 640 gallons
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
The last dollar had been spent, the last resource and the last starving patriot milked dry, and the great adventure still trembled on the scales.
Forty men in one ship hunting the Sperm Whale for forty-eight months think they have done extremely well, and thank God, if at last they carry home the oil of forty fish.
He who hath always much-indulged himself, sickeneth at last by his much- indulgence.
"The Baron wants money," she said; "I must get on with my play." What she saw or dreamed while she was in your room last night, it is at present impossible to discover.
The cook, for all her violent temper, behaved very differently: she sent up a message to say that she would stop and help us to the last. And Thomas (who has never yet been in any other place than ours) spoke so gratefully of my dear father's unvarying kindness to him, and asked so anxiously to be allowed to go on serving us while his little savings lasted, that Magdalen and I forgot all formal considerations and both shook hands with him.
In this last book thou wilt find nothing (or at most very little) of that nature.
In those last weeks, though we did not know it, my sister was dying on her feet.
So the woodman at last said he would sell Tom to the strangers for a large piece of gold, and they paid the price.
So at last he had given up, reserving his particular bit of exquisite mental torture for the last moment, when, just before the savage spears of the cannibals should for ever make the object of his hatred immune to further suffering, the Russian planned to reveal to his enemy the true whereabouts of his wife whom he thought safe in England.
Some say that she did it in all kindness of heart; while others aver that she was none other than the former Sheriff's daughter, and found her revenge at last in this cruel deed.
"Simply that he's been on my track for some time, probably ever since friend Crawshay slipped clean through his fingers last November.
"We remained locked up like this, last time," he said, "until you left the Opera to go home."