late binding

late binding

[¦lāt ′bīnd·iŋ]
(computer science)
The assignment of data types (such as integer or string) to variables at the time of execution of a computer program, rather than during the compilation phase.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dynamic binding

Also called "late binding," it is the linking of a routine or object at runtime based on the conditions at that moment. Contrast with early binding. See binding time and polymorphism.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The other way to declare an object, late binding, doesn't require that a library be loaded to specify the version of Excel.
binding" and "late binding" of variable expressions.
The likely intent here corresponds to late binding of the term "the
talking about early binding as opposed to late binding. When the Greeks
Smalltalk relies on late binding. Most Smalltalk applications begin with an informal and general specification that defines goals, such as having a particular style of screen presentation and interaction or supporting particular business processes.
Dynamic late binding permits full portability of Smalltalk applications, with the choice of the best implementation scenario based on the performance characteristics of an individual machine or the network of interacting machines on which the Smalltalk application is to execute.