late blight


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late blight

[′lāt ¦blīt]
(plant pathology)
A fungus blight disease in which symptoms do not appear until late in the growing season and vary for different species.
References in periodicals archive ?
Late blight, which requires a live plant host, is most prevalent in years in which summers are mild and rainy.
Published reports on possible association between foliar/tuber glycoalkaloids of potato and late blight disease resistance are variable (Friedman 2006).
We would like to use tomato varieties that have a genetic resistance to late blight, if possible.
The study found that the late blight genome is two and a half to four times larger than those of its relatives, mainly due to a massive amount of repetitive DNA.
Iron Lady,' a joint breeding project between Cornell University and North Carolina State, resists early and late blights as well as septoria leaf spot, a disease known to weaken plants after they've set fruit.
For example, at ARS's Small Grains and Potato Germplasm Research Unit in Aberdeen, Idaho, geneticist Rich Novy and plant pathologist Jonathan Whitworth spearhead a program to develop new potato lines that are resistant to different biotypes of the late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans.
Potato late blight can destroy fields in days, and was central to the Irish Potato Famine in the 1840s when 2 million people died from starvation and disease.
Benjy Firester won first place and $250,000 for his development of a mathematical model that uses disease data to predict how weather patterns could spread spores of the late blight fungus, which caused the Irish Potato Famine and still causes billions of dollars in crop damages annually.
Mustard, lentil and grass pea can be attacked by fungus during severe cold, tomatoes and potato may be affected by late blight diseases, battle leaf may fall and mango flower may get damaged during a cold wave.
This study presents a comparison of several measures of stability applied for rAUDPC (relative area under the disease progress curve) values, which describes the rate of late blight development on plants of 22 cultivars examined in 13 environments.
Second-generation Innate potatoes contain an additional trait: resistance to the destructive fungus called late blight, which caused the Irish potato famine of the mid-19th century and is still a problem.