sinus

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sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
This conclusion was made based on the findings during mastoidectomy, when we found normal bone covering the lateral sinus. Further search on literature must be conducted to conclude or exclude this statement.
[5] reported a case with facial nerve paralysis, lateral sinus thrombosis, and sensorineural hearing loss, Qirjazi et al.
The PSAA was observed in 89.3% of all sinuses; 71.1% of arteries were intraosseous, 13% were below the membrane, and only 5.2% were on the outer cortex of the lateral sinus wall.
This implies that clinical studies could be designed to investigate its effectiveness at lowering intraoperative complications, postsurgical patient discomfort, or other outcomes of interest, with no bias due to different window designs and positions such as that observed in current studies of lateral sinus augmentation.
Syms et al reported 6 cases of otogenic LST in which all patients underwent surgical intervention with mastoidectomy, exposure of the lateral sinus, and needle aspiration to confirm the diagnosis.
This patient had meningitis, lateral sinus thrombophlebitis and four extradural abscesses giving rise to a total of six intracranial complications.
The nonseptic type of lateral sinus thrombosis, which is not associated with ear or sinus infections, is being diagnosed with increasing frequency.
It has been shown that disease in the area of the lateral sinus can destroy the bone of the sinodural angle.
Complete mastoidectomy was performed, and the sigmoid sinus was skeletonized from the lateral sinus to the jugular bulb below.
Historically, the standard of therapy for IJV thrombosis secondary to lateral sinus thrombosis has been a cortical mastoidectomy along with IV antibiotic therapy.
The most common intracranial complication was brain abscess, followed by meningitis, lateral sinus thrombosis, and extradural abscess.