latewood


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latewood

[′lāt‚wu̇d]
(botany)
The portion of the annual ring that is formed after formation of earlywood has ceased.

summerwood

Wood which is formed during the later part of the growing season; characterized by compact, thick-walled cells; denser than spring wood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Relationship between March-May seasonal precipitation and total annual ring width, earlywood and latewood indexes of Pinus oocarpa.
splendens is more abundant in earlywood than in latewood, and most of each growth rings is latewood (Fig.
[28], tangential face NIR spectra could easily under- or overestimate properties based on whether an early-wood or latewood component of a ring was present where the spectrum was collected.
There is also a fluctuation in color, according to the structural regions of wood (earlywood and latewood).
Additionally, physically and chemically such wood presents lower density (BAO et al., 2001; KRETSCHMANN, 2008), lower moisture content (KRETSCHMANN, 2008), lower percentage of latewood, lower cellulose content, higher lignin content, higher longitudinal shrinkage, thinner cell walls (KRETSCHMANN, 1998) and lower natural durability (DUNISCH et al., 2010).
Each tree ring was exactly dated by using standard dendrochronologic methods described by Douglass (17), and earlywood and latewood growth increments were measured by using a stage micrometer.
Few teased out the seasonal climate signal recorded in the narrow part of the growth ring laid down in late summer known as latewood.
The anatomical demarcation between rings is readily identifiable in most conifers due to formation of denser, darker latewood at the end of the growing season that contrasts with the lighter earlywood of the following year.
The 50% formulation had adhesion problems to latewood. The 5% and 25% formulations of the silicone hybrid showed very good durability as compared to the acrylic control which was almost completely gone.
In members of the Thymelaeaceae, tori are especially well-developed in the latewood, and it is thought that this tissue provides a back-up water conducting system in case the earlywood should become embolized (Dute et al.
radiata trees revealed that genes involved in cytoskeleton development and secondary cell wall formation (cellulose and lignin biosynthesis) were preferentially Transcribed in wood with higher stiffness and low microfibril angle (latewood) [4].