latex

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latex,

emulsion of a polymer (e.g., rubberrubber,
any solid substance that upon vulcanization becomes elastic; the term includes natural rubber (caoutchouc) and synthetic rubber. The term elastomer is sometimes used to designate synthetic rubber only and is sometimes extended to include caoutchouc as well.
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) in water (see colloidcolloid
[Gr.,=gluelike], a mixture in which one substance is divided into minute particles (called colloidal particles) and dispersed throughout a second substance. The mixture is also called a colloidal system, colloidal solution, or colloidal dispersion.
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). Natural latexes are produced by a number of plants, are usually white in color, and often contain, in addition to rubber, various gums, oils, and waxes. Balata, caoutchouc, chicle, and gutta-percha are produced from natural latexes. Synthetic latexes may be prepared in two ways: the polymer may be prepared as an emulsion (emulsion polymerization), or the dry, powdered polymer may be dispersed in water. Both natural and synthetic latexes are widely used, especially in the production of rubber goods. Latex paints, sometimes called rubber-base paints, consist of a latex colored by the addition of a pigment.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Latex

 

the transparent, milk-white, yellowish brown, yellow, or orange contents of the latex vessels of plants.

A number of plants of the families Euphorbiaceae, Moraceae, and Compositae hold large amounts of latex, which contains (dissolved or suspended) carbohydrates, proteins, glycosides, salts, and essential oils. The characteristic components of the latex of gutta-percha-yielding and rubber-yielding plants are resins, gutta, and natural rubber. The latex of certain plants of the poppy family (Papaveraceae) contains large quantities of alkaloids. The latex of the papaya yields the enzyme papain.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

latex

[′lā‚teks]
(materials)
Milky colloid in which natural or synthetic rubber or plastic is suspended in water.
An elastomer product made from latex.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

latex

An emulsion of finely dispersed particles of natural or synthetic rubber or plastic materials in water.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

latex

1. a whitish milky fluid containing protein, starch, alkaloids, etc., that is produced by many plants. Latex from the rubber tree is used in the manufacture of rubber
2. a suspension of synthetic rubber or plastic in water, used in the manufacture of synthetic rubber products, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

LaTeX

(language, text, tool)
(Lamport TeX) Leslie Lamport <lamport@pa.dec.com>'s document preparation system built on top of TeX. LaTeX was developed at SRI International's Computer Science Laboratory and was built to resemble Scribe.

LaTeX adds commands to simplify typesetting and lets the user concentrate on the structure of the text rather than on formatting commands.

BibTeX is a LaTeX package for bibliographic citations.

Lamport's LaTeX book has an exemplary index listing every symbol, concept and example in the book. The index in the, now obsolete, first edition includes (on page 221) the mysterious entry "Gilkerson, Ellen, 221". The second edition (1994) has an entry for "infinite loop" instead.

["LaTeX, A Document Preparation System", Leslie Lamport, A-W 1986, ISBN 0-201-15790-X (first edition, now obsolete)].
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

LaTeX

(LAmport TeX) A document preparation system based on the TeX language developed by Leslie Lamport at SRI International. LaTeX provides a macro language for TeX that lets the user concentrate on the logical structure of the document rather than the format codes. See TeX.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
--to identify the most frequent molecular allergens for the diagnosis of genuine latex allergy in this symptomatic group by ImmunoCAP (ICAP) and to correlate these results with skin prick tests (SPT).
American Academy of Dermatology's position paper on latex allergy. J Am Acad Dermatol 1998; 39(1): 98-106.
Keywords: Anaesthesia complication, Intaoperative anaphylaxis, Latex allergy.
With a rush to cash in on the latex glove frenzy, irresponsible production of latex gloves left behind a significant amount of potentially harmful proteins on medical gloves, and individuals predisposed to a latex allergy were sensitized after prolonged use.
My latex allergy asthma is now controlled with an experimental drug, Xolair.
A GRANDMOTHER has spoken of her life being 'ruined' by a severe latex allergy which means she can't go near balloons.
Latex allergies affect up to 17% of healthcare workers and 1% of the general population-three million people--according to the American Latex Allergy Association.
Health care workers face a wide range of threats on the job, from needlesticks and back injuries to latex allergy, stress and assault.
Teresa's self-deprecating humor and such moments as role-playing with her childhood Ken and Barbie and discovering she has a latex allergy while putting a condom on a banana in health class will make readers laugh out loud as the teen copes with personal changes and the changes going on around her.